research

Xavier University has received a $19.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The money is from an NIH initiative called Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity.

It will be used to expand biomedical programs at the historically black university.

Xavier says the award is part of a $240 million NIH investment involving more than 10 institutions. It’s aimed at developing new approaches to engage student researchers, including those from underrepresented backgrounds.

EMSL / Flickr

Fourteen researchers from a coalition of universities in Louisiana and Mississippi have been awarded $6 million from the National Science Foundation.

The scientists are part of a consortium of universities working on developing smart polymers.

Smart polymers are materials that can react to the environment — like a self-healing artificial joint, or a heart valve that can resist bacterial growth.

Sergey Uryadnikov / Shutterstock.com

A Tulane expert in viral epidemics raging in West Africa says it’s time to expand experimental treatments. Some are showing promise.

Top research scientists from across Louisiana met at LSU Health Shreveport Wednesday to work on improving collaboration across their institutions. 

They’re doing it with the help of LA CaTS, the Louisiana Clinical and Translational Science Center in Baton Rouge. It’s funded by a five-year, $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The aim is to promote more unified research. Dr. William Cefalu, executive director of Pennington Biomedical Research Center where LA CaTS is based, led the conference.

The LSU AgCenter is hiring four new faculty members who will be statewide water experts based at the Red River Research Station in Bossier City.

The new positions include an irrigation engineer, a water quality scientist, a plant soil scientist and a water policy economist.

Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge presents physicians and researchers investigating Parkinson's on Saturday, July 27. Carol Harrison, a researcher who has Parkinson's herself, has been instrumental in coming up with the line-up for the Parkinson's Disease Conference in its first two years.

More information is available at www.pbrc.edu/events/parkinsons.


The head of a nonprofit advocacy group that promotes health research said Louisiana stands to lose millions of dollars in medical research funding due to the across-the-board federal spending cuts known as the sequester. Mary Woolley, president of the Alexandria, Va.-based Research!America, said the National Institutes of Health distributes billions of dollars to universities and research institutions – and the grants are getting scarcer and more competitive.

A Tulane University researcher has received $2 million to study improvements in the nation’s blood supply. It’s one of 20 awards handed out by the National Institutes of Health Director program.

Sergey Shevkoplyas is an assistant professor at the Tulane Department of Biomedical Engineering. He’ll be studying how some red blood cells degrade during storage.

The National Institutes of Health says it will relocate 110 of its chimpanzees from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's New Iberia Research Center and to stop using the animals for biomedical testing.

The Advocate reports that the plan was announced Friday.

The move comes as NIH decides how best to implement recommendations that call for more stringent standards on biomedical research using chimpanzees, considered the closest relative to humans in the animal kingdom.

The University of Louisiana-Monroe College of Business has been awarded a research contract from the Louisiana Department of Insurance to study and provide support for proposed legislative insurance reforms.

The News-Star reports the research is designed to provide support for proposals to improve the Louisiana insurance market, making insurance more widely available and rates more affordable.

The college has done work on the subject for several years under state contracts.

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