recovery

Elizabeth Mahoney, St. Bernard resident and peer counselor.
Brett Anderson

The devastation of Hurricane Katrina and the floods that followed is most visible in pictures of ruined houses and people’s destroyed possessions lying out on city streets. But there’s unseen damage that runs even deeper: the collective emotional trauma experienced by the thousands of people who lived through it.

The flooded streets and destroyed homes of the New Orleans neighborhood known as the Lower Ninth Ward were among the most powerful and iconic images from Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath 10 years ago.

Now, much of New Orleans is back — more than half of the city's neighborhoods have recovered some 90 percent of their pre-storm population.

That's not the case for the Lower Ninth.

Today, there's a feeling of desolation on nearly every block of the predominantly African-American neighborhood.

A new Data Center report released today says that 10 years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans is rebounding. However, demographers say prosperity is not distributed equally.

New Orleans looks different 10 years after Hurricane Katrina. Some neighborhoods are gentrified. Others are still full of empty lots.

And the population is different. African American residents remain the majority, but not by as much. There are more white residents than before the storm. And the single men who came north from Mexico and Central America to help rebuild are having a lasting effect.

Alexandra Garreton

According to numbers from the US Census and the IRS, 236,970 people left Louisiana between the summer of 2005 and the summer of 2006, mostly because of Hurricane Katrina.

Census details can’t tell who is a former resident returning and who’s new, but as of last year, the state had only recovered about 100,000 people, less than half of those who left. Whether it's abandoned houses or empty chairs at the dinner table, New Orleans is rebuilding around a conspicuous absence.

This week on The Debris, stories of people and things missing from, and just missing, New Orleans.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

As the 10th anniversary of Katrina approaches, many school leaders and policymakers are weighing in on New Orleans' education system. But what about families? At a recent panel, parents took to the stage to reflect on the past 10 years.

Eight parents were featured speakers on the panel. They talked about enrollment, governance and accountability.

Eve Abrams

Ten years after New Orleans flooded following Hurricane Katrina, the city has regained roughly 79 percent of its population. But that doesn’t mean it has 79 percent of the same people.

Much has changed about where New Orleanians live, but one of the biggest is that 97,000 fewer black people live in Orleans Parish than before the storm. It’s hard to pin down exactly where everyone went, but you can get a glimpse of why on one particular street corner. Eve Abrams investigats how who gets on the Megabus tells the story of New Orleans’ diaspora.

Mallory Falk

Of all the changes New Orleans has seen in the ten years since Katrina, the restructuring of the city's public school system is perhaps the most drastic. In place of a traditional school district, most Orleans Parish schools are now governed by a loose confederation of charter operators. What does this new model mean for students, teachers and parents in New Orleans?

Jesse Hardman

According to a study by the Data Center, the Hispanic population of the New Orleans metro area has nearly doubled since the year 2000. Many people immigrated from Mexico and Central America, or migrated from other parts of the U.S. to work in cleanup and construction after Katrina. The Latino population of greater New Orleans continues to grow and reshape the culture of the city.

Brown Pelicans recovering at the Fort Jackson bird rehabilitation center in the aftermath of the BP oil spill.
Jason Saul

The announcement of a settlement over BP oil spill claims means that billions of dollars could come to the state of Louisiana over the next decade. Much of that money will help fund restoration projects as part of the state’s coastal master plan.

A coalition of local non-profits are trying to help educate business owners on emergency preparedness. 

 

A recent city survey asked local business owners what kind of steps they’d taken to deal with disasters and emergencies. 50 percent said they had no written emergency plans. Around half also said they have no backup generators, and no interruption insurance in case their businesses close suddenly.

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