recovery

Listening Post NOLA
7:00 am
Thu March 20, 2014

The Listening Post Asks: Is Art Essential To The Revitalization Of New Orleans?

Citizens artists create their own street signs along Bayou St. John.
Jesse Hardman

Every week WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and reports back on the community's response. This week's topic is art and revitalization.

Local artist Jacques Duffourc has made New Orleans his canvas for many years.

"Everyone has a voice and everyone is a creator themselves and creates the place that they want around them. And they're allowed to do so. There's not a whole lot of rules here. If you want to walk around with your pajamas on, people are going to celebrate that," says Duffourc.

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Theater
4:00 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Deepwater, Center-Stage: Disaster Through Survivors' Eyes

Gary Barthelmy, Oyster Fisherman is a portrait by Reeva Wortel, used in conjunction with the production of Spill, a play that runs through March 30 at the Swine Palace in Baton Rouge.
Reeva Wortel

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 3:50 pm

Eleven died and hundreds of millions of gallons of oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico when BP's Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in 2010. But beneath the tragedy, there's a complex story about people's relationships to oil. That's what's explored in Spill, a new play by one of the creators of The Laramie Project.

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BP Oil Spill
7:00 am
Tue March 4, 2014

BP Loses Appeal Of Payment Process

A Grand Isle beach soiled with oil after the BP spill.
Jason Saul WWNO

BP has lost an appeal of how much it has to pay in damages caused by its 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. A split decision by a three-judge panel could restart a payment process that has been on hold while the appeal was pending.

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Professor Longhair
6:53 pm
Sat March 1, 2014

New Orleans Piano Legend's Home Finally Restored After Katrina

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 9:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Professor Longhair's house has been saved. Now, last year we brought you a story about the piano legend and the nationwide effort to rebuild his home following Hurricane Katrina. Henry Roeland Byrd, better known as Professor Longhair, is widely considered to be the father of modern New Orleans music. He died in 1980, but at carnival time especially, it's evident that Professor Longhair's influence endures. Now, his house will too. Gwen Thompkins brings us this story of music and more.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Professor Longhair
11:48 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Major Renovations To Professor Longhair's House Provide Home To Family, Fans

People filled the streets to celebrate the renovation of Professor Longhair's house. The Central City home will house Longhair's family, as well as a place for fans to celebrate the pianist.
Credit Eileen Fleming / WWNO

The descendants of New Orleans’ renowned rhythm and blues pianist Professor Longhair will soon be back in their Central City house again. A major renovation has made it possible for his family and fans to have a permanent home.

The Stooges Brass Band welcomed dozens of people attending the unveiling of Professor Longhair’s house.

The one and only home ever purchased by the music legend has been renovated. His daughter, Pat Byrd, and grandson Ardell, are moving back in this week.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
2:14 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Treme's David Simon: 'I'm A Storyteller'

David Simon.
Credit American Library Association

He’s been telling the same epic story of the American city for years, one corner at a time — first on the pages of The Baltimore Sun, then in the books Homicide: Life on the Killing Streets and The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood.

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Latest News
2:00 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Appeal Planned In Jefferson Parish Katrina Flooding Lawsuit

Attorneys who brought a class-action lawsuit against Jefferson Parish say they will appeal a 9-3 jury verdict that found the parish was negligent in its emergency response planning but that the negligence didn't cause the flooding suffered by tens of thousands of Jefferson property owners during Hurricane Katrina.

Attorney Richard Martin tells The New Orleans Advocate the plaintiffs' legal team is still working out the details and may even go back to Judge John Peytavin's court with a post-trial motion first.

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Community
5:07 am
Mon January 6, 2014

7th Ward Residents Await The Return Of The Circle Food Store

The iconic outside of the Circle Food Store.
Laine Kaplan-Levenson

More than eight years after it flooded and closed due to Hurricane Katrina, the Circle Food Store on the corner of Claiborne and St. Bernard Avenues is about to reopen its doors. The historic landmark served the 7th Ward from 1938 up until the storm, and it’s said to have been the first New Orleans grocery owned and operated by African-Americans. Long time residents and customers voice their reactions to the long-awaited return of this neighborhood staple.

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Education
7:08 am
Fri December 27, 2013

What's The Role Of The Recovery School District After Schools Recover?

All schools eligibe to leave the RSD this year decided to stay, instead of returning to city school board control.
mahlness Creative Commons

The state-run Recovery School District took over nearly all New Orleans public schools after Hurricane Katrina. Soon, it won't run any. It will, however, oversee dozens of charter schools, including 17 local schools which recently decided they wanted to stay in the state system instead of returning to the local school board.

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Education
3:29 pm
Tue December 10, 2013

New Orleans' Rat Fighters Go Beyond Baiting Traps

A rat forages for food in the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans in 2006, a year after Hurricane Katrina. Blighted buildings and fewer people led to an increase in the city's rat population.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 11:30 am

Marvin Thompson knew he faced a difficult task when he was hired last year as principal at John McDonogh High School in New Orleans.

"The day that I pulled up to this building, I thought it was condemned," Thompson says.

The structure, built in 1898, was sagging and leaky and missing entire window panes. Inside, students were underperforming academically.

And then, there were the rats. Thompson and his two children didn't even finish unpacking his office before they discovered that problem.

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