recovery

Mental Health, Post-Disaster

Dec 21, 2016
Della Hasselle / WWNO

Beyond the tangible needs - like housing, and infrastructure - there’s a mental health component to disaster recovery. Traumatic experiences carry an emotional and psychological cost, and many victims continue to struggle long after their homes have been rebuilt.

But as WWNO’s Della Hasselle reports, local charities are available - providing counseling and assistance to help people rebuild their lives, and emerge from trauma stronger.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Thousands of Louisiana flood victims are still living in hotels as part of FEMAs Temporary Shelter Assistance program.

On the list of FEMA relief options, the hotel vouchers are meant as a short-term solution -- but four months later, it's still the only option for many people who can't return home.

Jessica Rosgaard / WWNO

Louisiana’s second flood recovery funding request has fallen short on Capitol Hill.

Legislation currently under consideration in Congress will fund the federal government through the end of April. It includes $1.4 billion in flood relief for Louisiana.

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a jury verdict finding that State Farm Fire and Casualty Co. defrauded the federal government after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005.

In the years before the hurricane, State Farm issued both federal government-backed flood insurance policies and general homeowners policies. After the hurricane, the company ordered its claims adjusters to misclassify wind damage as flood damage to shift liability to the government and spare the insurance company's coffers.

Eve Troeh/WWNO

It's been over 100 days since floodwaters rose up to the rooftops in parts of Baton Rouge, La. The so-called 1,000-year flood hit neighborhoods that had never seen such a disaster. But to some flood victims, it was all too familiar - those who moved to Baton Rouge from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina about a decade ago.

Jessica Rosgaard / WWNO

As this holiday season begins, Louisiana waits on federal disaster relief funding; no word yet on the Governor's request to Congress for an additional four billion dollars. While some flood victims spent Thanksgiving in newly fixed houses, thousands more are still not home. Jessica Rosgaard went to a free holiday meal for flood victims in Baton Rouge.

Jessica Rosgaard / WWNO

Three months after flood waters devastated southeast Louisiana, Governor John Bel Edwards is hoping his second request for federal funds will be approved before Congress adjourns for the year. Part of the $4-billion request would be designated for infrastructure improvements. He addressed the topic in his monthly radio call-in show.

The deadline to apply for funding under the state Shelter at Home program is this Friday, October 21st.

The program provides up to $15,000 for basic repairs allowing residents to live in in their homes as they continue the rebuilding process. Ten thousand people have already benefited from the program. 

Eligible repairs include weatherproofing, securing broken doors and windows, and a safety inspection of wiring and plumbing. Money for temporary appliances such as small refrigerators and microwaves is also available.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Louisiana’s governor, John Bel Edwards, was in Washington DC last week lobbying Congress to approve a disaster aid package of nearly $3 billion to help with flood relief. Part of that would go to help small businesses recover. In addition to more than 140,000 homes, nearly 7,000 businesses were flooded-out.

Eve Troeh

This week on All Things New Orleans, we get into Cajun country rice fields with Tegan Wendland, for an update on ruined crops after the 2016 Louisiana floods. Public policy lawyer Jeffrey Thomas has made disaster a bigger part of his work after the levee failures of Katrina. He talks about the road ahead for long-term recovery and using federal funds to help flooded communities.

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