A comprehensive water-management plan for the greater New Orleans region is marking its second year. Partners in the program say they’re optimistic that people will adapt to a new way of living with water.

New Orleans agencies are conducting online auctions to sell off property. Two University of New Orleans experts are saying the whole process should be ramped up.

The 10th Annual Louisiana Smart Growth Summit explores best practices for statewide planning. The Center for Planning and Excellence, CPEX, runs the event Tuesday and Wednesday in Baton Rouge.

CPEX CEO Elizabeth Boo Thomas says what Louisiana really needs is transportation and housing.

Richard Campanella

Each month we talk with Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Times-Picayune. This month the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture reflects on the idea of natural disasters and their historic impact on New Orleans.

While Katrina’s 10th Anniversary is taking center stage right now, WWNOs Jesse Hardman sat down with Campanella to talk about another famous hurricane, in 1722, that allowed French city planners to completely redesign the city.

Bring New Orleans Back Commission / Urban Land Institute

The first comprehensive map for rebuilding New Orleans came out in early 2006, about six months after the flood. Saying it was highly anticipated would be an understatement. On it, some symbols that appeared as a death knell for some neighborhoods: green dots.

The New Orleans City Council has approved a major revamp of the city’s zoning plan. The vote came after four years of meetings and several hours of last-minute debate. The Times-Picayune Archive

Every month WWNO talks to Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for In this edition the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture delves into the former Chinatown, and the history of Chinese-Americans in the city.

Chinese immigrants were first brought to Louisiana in hopes that they would work as inexpensive labor for sugar plantations after the Civil War. When that didn't work out, they began to move to the city.

G. E. Arnold,|The Times-Picayune archive

In this month's Cityscapes column at, Tulane Professor of Geography Richard Campanella explores some very real consequences of draining urban wetlands for building.

Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

WHAT: The Landscape Architect

A landscape architect is trained to design everything outside of a building — where pedestrians flow, where plants grow, seating, parks, playgrounds, sports fields, etc. Everything outside of the building is "landscape." This work includes the manipulation of spaces like grading and terrain modeling. The idea is to create outdoor spaces for people to use.

HOW it relates to green stormwater management and infrastructure:

Between Essen, Bluebonnet, Perkins and I-10 in Baton Rouge, there’s a whole bunch of health clinics and medical facilities – including Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Baton Rouge General, The Baton Rouge Clinic, and Pennington Biomedical. 

Chances are you'll get stuck in traffic when you drive through that corridor. 

The Baton Rouge Area Foundation has set out to address that problem by creating a new Health District that would not only mean you sit through fewer traffic lights, but that health care is delivered more efficiently.