Paul Prudhomme

Terry Flettrich Rohe on the set of WDSU's "Midday" show, a popular news-talk program, which she produced and hosted.
Courtesy of Dominic Massa / WWL-TV

Terry Flettrich Rohe, a New Orleans broadcast pioneer and beloved host of WDSU's "Mrs. Muffin's Birthday Party" passed away on Thursday. In addition to co-creating and hosting the children's show in the 1950s, Rohe was producer and host of the network's popular "Midday" show.

K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen staff photo, 1981.
Courtesy of Frank Brigtsen

Chef Paul Prudhomme changed the American food world forever with his creative, exuberant love for Creole and Cajun food. He was the first American chef to take the reins at Commander's Palace — where the world first had a taste of his culinary genius. He pioneered the now commonplace farm-to-table movement, as he championed Louisiana's farmers and fishermen. As Ella Brennan said, “He had magic in his hands.”

Chef Prudhomme and Chef Frank Brigtsen, passing the skillet outside of Brigtsen's Restaurant, 1986.
Courtesy of Frank Brigtsen

As we reach the end of 2015, we're taking a look back at the triumphs and tragedies of the year past.

2015 was a big year for Louisiana Eats! This June, we celebrated our fifth anniversary on the air, with listeners and friends including the NPR affiliates WWNO, WRKF, KRVS and Red River Radio. We found ourselves traveling across the state, the country and the world, covering topics ranging from substance abuse in the service industry, revelry and tradition at the annual Blackpot Festival in Lafayette, ghosts in the attic at Tujague's Restaurant, seafood innovation on the Gulf Coast and the domestic slave trade in America.

"Man, in New Orleans we really are fortunate — we got some of the best things in the world," Chef Paul Prudhomme once said. "And one of those things is the muffuletta sandwich."

And one of the best things about New Orleans was Prudhomme himself.

He was known for introducing blackened redfish to the rest of us, for his cooking demos and for his line of magic spices. Needless to say, Prudhomme changed the way the world saw Louisiana cooking.

He has died at the age of 75.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

Paul Prudhomme, the internationally-known New Orleans chef and restaurateur, has died. He was 75.

Prudhomme popularized Cajun and Creole cooking in the 1980’s. His death was confirmed by his restaurant, K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen, according to WWL-TV.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is pushing a new shopping method called “food hubs” to get more local produce to market. Deputy Secretary Kathleen Merrigan made the announcement at the Hollygrove Market and Farm in New Orleans.