Office of Motor Vehicles

It looks like the cost of a driver’s license is going up—but so is the length of time between renewals.

“The fee will be more, but it’s a six year fee, so over time it’ll be the same,” explains Franklin Foil.

The Baton Rouge representative authored the measure increasing both the cost and expiration dates for all Louisiana drivers’ licenses. A basic license, which now costs $21.50 and is good for four years, will be going up to $32.50, and will be valid for six years.

A bill making its way through the Louisiana Legislature would let Cajun citizens celebrate their ancestry by customizing their driver's license, adding the phrase "I'm a Cajun" below their photograph.

It would cost $5 to add the message; the money would go toward "scholarships distributed by the Council for the Development of French in Louisiana, a program promoting French language and culture in the state," reports

The Louisiana Office of Motor Vehicles has reopened of its office located at 100 Veterans Memorial Blvd. in New Orleans. The original building was destroyed during Hurricane Katrina.

The new office, which will serve the east banks of New Orleans and Jefferson Parish, features the latest technology in motor vehicle services to assist customers with driver's license and identification cards, road skills testing, and vehicle registration.

OMV Commissioner Stephen Campbell said the state is also working on plans to open express locations in Kenner and eastern New Orleans.

Louisiana driver's licenses still don't comply with federal law, but the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has granted the state a temporary break.

That means travelers won't need passports to fly within the United States, the American Press reports.

The Real ID Act of 2005 requires identification cards to meet standards to enter federal buildings or board commercial flights.

Louisiana's motor vehicles commissioner, Nick Gautreaux, is leaving the job in August.

Gautreaux told The Advocate that he is planning a career in corporate development and governmental work, a move that will keep him closer to home and his five children in Youngsville.

A former state senator, Gautreaux took the position as commissioner of the Office of Motor Vehicles in December 2010. His last day will be Aug. 5, according to a spokesman for the Louisiana State Police, which oversees the office.