Michael Murphy

When it comes to traveling, nobody wants to be seen as a tourist anymore. “Authenticity” is valued above all other experiences and because of that, author Michael Murphy has written several books that explain New Orleans’ iconographic culture to outsiders and locals alike. 


Louisiana State Museums, like the Cabildo and Presbytere in Jackson Square, are feeling the strain from new budget cuts that could jeopardize their operation. To find out how this problem might be solved, NolaVie’s Sharon Litwin spoke with Mark Tullos, the Assistant Secretary for the office of State Museums.

For Architect Mark Hash, Art Is Concrete... And Abstract

Apr 20, 2016

Pause for a moment and consider your neighborhood through the eyes of an architect. You’d expect geometric shapes, locations, and other spatial relationships to be foundational to their perspective, so it may surprise you to hear how abstract their creative process can be. Recently, architect Mark Hash discussed how his structured mind has changed over the years with NolaVie’s Kelley Crawford. 

There was a time when most neighborhoods in New Orleans had their own movie house, but they slowly disappeared and were replaced by multiplex theaters. But as everything becomes localized these days, so have options for seeing movies. The latest space to open is the Broad Theater, a four room theater house in an old Spanish colonial building in Mid-City.

Women With A Vision 'Do The Work Alongside Our Community'

Mar 23, 2016
Women With a Vision

One of the mottos knocked around the offices of Women With A Vision is “We serve at the feet of those who suffer the most.” For 25 years they've worked with African American women, the LGBTQ community, and other people living in harmful situations to help them with advocacy, supportive services and community-based participatory research.

Erik Frank won the Blackstone Big Idea award at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week in 2013.
Erik Frank

Erik Frank had been in business for a year when he went to New Orleans’ Entrepreneur Week and got caught up in its fervor. Thousands wanted to see “the next big thing,” and Erik made himself a promise that his idea -- nutritional meals delivered to your job -- would be it. A year later, he pitched before celebrity judges and won $50,000 for his business, Your Nutrition Delivered.

Christy George is concerned that too many Americans are in denial about climate change and is trying a find a new approach to change their minds. She believes that people join social movements once they’re convinced it’s the right thing to do, so she’s collecting personal stories from locals who have been impacted by rising tides and temperatures for her new book, My Vanishing Hometowns.

ULGNOYP\Jameeta Youngblood

As demographics in New Orleans continue to shift, a pivotal issue among young African Americans is to find and develop leaders in the community. WWNO’s business manager Jameeta Youngblood and Brian Turner of Xavier University’s psychology department know this all too well: they’ve both spent years serving on different organizations around town and have experienced firsthand the challenges that need to be overcome.

Janet Wilson

There’s a special group of improvisers in New Orleans who want nothing more than to get hospital-bound kids to laugh. They're called Funny Bones Improv and on this week’s Notes from New Orleans, Sharon Litwin talks with two of their leaders: executive director, Janet Wilson, and local director and performer Emily Slazer. 


Over the past year, local educational organizations have joined a new program funded by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. It’s called Any Given Child and it helps schools integrate artistic lessons into their curriculum. Echo Olander of KIDsmART has been essential to the program’s local development, and spoke with NolaVie’s Renee Peck about what they’ve learned and where they’re going.