music

This week on Continuum you'll hear a recording of another live concert by New Orleans Musica da Camera. Jongleur, Jester, Trickster was a special concert given by Musica da Camera in 2012. It is music from the 13th and 14th centuries of France, Italy, England & Spain.

Thais St. Julien also gives narrative information before the performance of each musical selection. The music is from the Musica da Camera CD, Jongleur, Jester, Trickster, Belle Alliance BA006.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

The New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation unwrapped a gift to the city on Friday — complete with a giant red bow. City officials, musicians, and New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival founder George Wein cut the ribbon on the George and Joyce Wein Jazz and Heritage Center.
 
The former funeral home in the 1200 block of Rampart Street has been redeveloped as a jazz education center. Free classes for budding musicians will be held in rooms full of instruments, music stands, and screens for digital and remote learning.
 

This week on Inside the Arts, we talk with Steven Edwards, music director of the Symphony Chorus of New Orleans.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Preservationists and music lovers in Mandeville are working to create a new seasonal tradition — enjoying jazz music in an open-air, historic jazz hall. Cars lined a back street in a Mandeville neighborhood on a recent Friday, as soft Christmas lights and the sound of jazz lit up the warm autumn air.

Eve Abrams

Chateau Poulet is the latest in the musical architecture series of New Orleans Airlift. Co-founder and artistic director Delaney Martin says, yes, that name would translate to: Chicken House.

"I don’t know where they got that," Martin says.  "It does have a creature-like visage, I think."

Airlift started making musical houses in 2010 with the Music Box, a Shanty Town Sound Laboratory. It was a small village of structures that were also instruments. Over 100 musicians played concerts in the Music Box and 15,000 people visited it.

The nightingale was a complex symbol for medieval writers. Her song was a reminder of both the joys and sorrows of earthly love. She is referred to very often in medieval songs, motets and polyphony.

This week you'll hear some of this music in a recording of a live Musica da Camera concert. The program is from the Musica da Camera's CD, Praise To The Nightingale, Belle Alliance BA005.

Music Inside Out

The name that our musical guests have most consistently mentioned is Professor Longhair. It began, well, at the beginning. Longhair, whose friends call him Fess, figured into the very first answer from the very first guest on the very first Music Inside Out.

Since then, others have conjured his name when describing the best of New Orleans music. As it turns out, Longhair — who died in 1980 — remains a guiding spirit to musicians and music lovers everywhere. So as a matter of duty and privilege, we’re spreading the joy.

NPR Music is throwing a Tiny Desk contest to help fans discover unknown artists. The Tiny Desk Concerts series at NPR has long been a place to see well-known musicians, as well as a launching pad for many others. Now, we're looking for true unknowns. We're asking bands and musicians all over the country to film themselves performing one song behind a desk of their choice.

The winner will play NPR's famous Tiny Desk in Washington, D.C., and travel to Austin, Texas, in March 2015 to appear in Lagunitas' CouchTrippin' showcase.

No, not medieval football music, but this week on Continuum Milton Scheuermann and Thais St. Julien present another recording of a live Musica da Camera concert. It is Music of New Orleans Medieval Saints.

Saints Included are, St. Nicholas, St. Ursula, St. Peter, St. James, and of course, St. Expeditus.

Musica da Camera is joined by the female voices of Vox Feminae. The program is from the Musica da Camera's CD, Geaux Saints, Belle Alliance BA004.

This week on Continuum Milton Scheuermann and Thais St. Julien present a live recording of a recent Musica da Camera concert about Love.

The music is of diverse places and times and includes selections by medieval composers Petrus de Cruce, La Comtessa de Dia, Guillaume de Machaut and, of course, the ubiquitous Anonymous. The program is from the Musica da Camera's CD, Love Is Where You Find It, Belle Alliance BA007.

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