music

Credit: Courtesy of the artist

This week on Inside the Arts, conversation with renowned jazz saxophonist Donald Harrison, Jr. He'll perform this weekend with internationally acclaimed trumpeter Eddie Henderson.

On this Continuum you'll hear a special program of early Christmas music performed by the New Orleans Musica da Camera. This is music from their CD, Natus Est, directed by Continuum hosts Milton Scheuermann and Thais St. Julien.

Credit: Mark Higashino

This week on Inside the Arts, conversation with jazz icon Dee Dee Bridgewater. The Grammy award winning singer-songwriter will join Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra in a performance of works from the Holiday songbook.

Then, we travel back in time to Bedford Falls, New York for a live radio stage production of It's A Wonderful Life. The NOLA Voice Talent Foundation brings the Holiday classic to NOLA Christmasfest.

This week, Continuum presents a program of medieval Christmas music, most of which is unknown to modern day listeners. Beginning with Aquitanian selections of the 12th century, the program progresses through the Italian, Spanish and German repertoire, ending with a selection of 15th century English carols.

Producer Scott Billington, with Irma Thomas and Dr. John.
MusicInsideOut.org

There’s a good chance that the name “Scott Billington” is on the back of your favorite album. Make that “albums.” As a long-time music producer for Rounder Records, Billington has tended the most fertile ground of American music.

Experiments In Sound: Noise Musicians In New Orleans

Dec 10, 2015
Greg Scott

Noise music: the two words sound like they should never be paired together, right? But for a small pocket of atypical musicians, swirling sounds that ebb and flow unpredictably are as necessary as Jackson Pollack's abstracts or Marcel Duchamp's found art.

Kelley Crawford sat down with a pair of noise musicians for NolaVie's Artist in Their Own Words.

English singer, lutenist, guitarist and composer Martin Best is the subject of this Continuum program. He has been active in early music since the mid 1970s with special emphasis on Renaissance music and minstrel songs of the French troubadours and trouveres.

John Boutte.
robbiesaurus / Flickr via MusicInsideOut.org

John Boutté is hard to intimidate. He may be the only guy who has ever told Stevie Wonder that his singing was flat. Boutté’s observation, during a chance encounter with Wonder, changed his life for good. What’s more, it made our lives better.

For more than 20 years, Boutté has built a career writing and performing his own songs, as well as re-interpreting the signature work of others. This week, Boutté tells Music Inside Out how he got so good at finding lyrics to suit his voice, his tenderness, his outrage and his legendary sass.

On this program Continuum presents complete recordings of the earliest English songs in existence. They come from the two important collections, The Worcester Fragments and a collection known only as The Earliest Songbook of England. Both contain anonymous music from 13th and 14th century England.

Continuum presents a program of the harpsichord music of Johann Sebastian Bach, played by the legendary harpsichordist Wanda Landowska. The major woks to be heard are the Chromatic Fantasia, and the Italian Concerto.

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