music

Zack Smith

They are rooted in the quartet singing tradition and a capella harmonies from the turn of the last century. For more than 40 years, The Zion Harmonizers enjoyed an unparalleled platform at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, anchoring and curating the Gospel Tent.

In the church of New Orleans jazz, they’ve had the keys to the church of church.

Thank goodness. It’s wonderful.

This week on Continuum you'll hear a special program devoted to the art of the recorder in early music presented by the legendary David Munrow and the Early Music Consort of London.

Recordings used are from The Art of the Recorder — Testament SBT2 1368 — a 2 CD set.

This week on Continuum you'll hear dance music of the Renaissance by three major composers of the 17th century: Thoinot Arbeau of France, and William Byrd and John Playford of England.

Among the dances heard will be branles, basse dances and pavans. Recordings used are; "Danses Populairies Francaises", performed by The Broadside Band - Harmonia Mundi HMA 1951152, and "William Byrd - Virginals & Consorts", performed by Capriccio Stravagante under the direction of New Orleanian Skip Sempe - Auvidis E 8611.

Treewoman8 / Flickr

The excesses of the carnival season are over. So this week, we’re playing sacred music with a foothold in Louisiana. Some songs are religious. Some aren’t. But they’re guaranteed to help get you ready for Easter, or Passover, or whatever day you’ve got circled on the calendar.

Mahalia Jackson, John Boutté, Branford Marsalis, Irma Thomas, Allen Toussaint, and Davell Crawford are in the mix. And so is the brass band that wants to know, “Whatcha gonna do for the rest of your life? Whatcha gonna do to make it right?”

Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and other intimate spaces within the community. Each month, seven storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Deacon John does it all. The veteran New Orleans bandleader plays weddings, birthdays, proms, debutante parties. He holds his own at Jazz Fest and at carnival balls. He'll play 1950s R&B, rock, jazz, gospel, soul and disco — whatever the people want to hear. But when it's up to him, he chooses the blues.

Excerpts from the medieval musical, "The Play of Robin and Marion", will be featured on this week's Continuum. Composed by the 13th century trouvère Adam de la Halle, this pastoral work is considered by some to be one of the first operas written.

The recording is an historic live performance given in 1984 by musicians of the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, the famous early music school in Basel, Switzerland. CD is "Le Jeu de Robin et Marion", Focus 913.

While Oakland, California-based musician Fantastic Negrito has been declared winner of NPR's Tiny Desk contest, we wanted to take a moment to shine a light on all of the entries that came out of the Baton Rouge area.

This week on Continuum you'll hear recording of a live New Orleans Musica da Camera concert from October 5, 2014.

It is A Voice Still Heard — Medieval Sephardic Song, recorded at Ursuline Chapel in New Orleans.

This is a repeat of a concert give by Musica da Camera in 1990 at Gates of Prayer Synagogue in New Orleans and broadcast nationally over American Public Radio. The recording is on the CD, A Voice Still Heard - Belle Alliance BA 011.

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