Bob Travis / Flickr

When the microphone switches on, some people freeze. They can’t think of a thing to say. But Terence Blanchard relaxes.

Blanchard does some of his best thinking in front of a microphone and he’s impatient to get his ideas recorded. That might explain why he is so prolific and why he is so good.

A celebration of the food, music, and culture of the region is this weekend as part of the North Delta Ramble.

Event founder Alan Brockman say his ongoing passion is to promote and spotlight the area's unique sense of Americana through it's culture.  "We wanted to bring attention to great styles of music and share the story of the food and culture that make this region so special," says Brockman.

Denny Culbert

Okay Louisiana: what’s the Cajun band that’s also psychedelic rock, or maybe even a little punk? Hint: they’re from Lafayette, they were started by two brothers 16 years ago, and they’re a huge force behind younger generations embracing Cajun culture. Still not sure? Think: roaming around slow moving water.

In collaboration with Louisiana Cultural Vistas, Eve Abrams brings us this profile of the Lost Bayou Ramblers.

With Spring now officially with us Continuum celebrates the new season with a special program of early English Music featuring a live performance by The Folger Consort of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C.

You'll hear "It Was a Lover and His Lass", "Daphne" and many other appropriate to the coming of Spring. Recordings used are: When Birds Do Sing (The Folger Consort) - Bard BDCD 1-9207 and William Byrd - Virginals & Consorts (Capriccio Stravagante) - Auvidis E 8611.

A collection of dances from the Middle Ages will be heard on this week's Continuum. Featured will be dances from 13th Century England, 14th Century France, as well as Renaissance lute dances from Italy performed by Early Instrument Ensemble Loinhdana and lutenist Ronn McFarlane.

Recordings used are: Estampies et Danses Royales du Moyen Age (Loinhdana) - Pierre Verany PV.790043 and Between Twos Hearts (Ronn McFarlane, lute) - Dorian DOR-90225.

Derek Bridges / Flickr

  As noggins in New Orleans go, there is no noggin like that of singer-songwriter Alex McMurray. He’s got more original characters in his head than a Hollywood film library. Why else would McMurray write a song about the man who shot the man who shot Liberty Valance? (Spoiler Alert: John Wayne is in the crosshairs).

The Llibre Vermell, "The Red Book", is the name given to the 14th century manuscript found in the library of the monastery of Monserrat in Spain. This manuscript is bound in red velvet and contains ten pilgrim songs and dances that probably would have been known by the pilgrims traveling to that monastery in the Middle Ages.

This week, we've brought the show to New Orleans, where Troy Andrews — better known as Trombone Shorty — began playing music at age 4. He was touring with his brother's band by age 6, and went to the same performing arts academy as Harry Connick Jr., Terence Blanchard and the Marsalis brothers. Now, just shy of 30, he's doing his part to spread New Orleans music around the world.

We've invited him to answer three questions about obscure musical instruments.

Babs Evangelista / Music Inside Out

Meschiya Lake & The Little Big Horns have been playing together as a band since 2009. But their repertoire suggests a much longer, deeper history, dating back to the early part of the last century, when people were buying phonographs and drinking absinthe in its original form.

Emily Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Last weekend, Spring Break vibes descended upon the riverfront in the form of neon, midriffs and pounding bass. The BUKU Music and Art Project swarmed Mardi Gras World with big names like STS9, TV On the Radio, and A$AP Rocky, and more underground acts like Run the Jewels and Odesza, for a mostly collegiate (and younger) crowd to rejoice in.