Neighborhood Story Project

There’s learning to play music in the school band, and then there’s learning to play music on the street — or the bandstand — from working musicians. In New Orleans, music education has its roots as much outside the classroom as in it.

Anonymous, Hans Holbein (II), 1547 / Rijksmuseum

This week on Continuum you'll hear the music that was used in the 1972 movie "Henry VIII And His Six Wives", performed by the Early Music Consort of London under the direction of the legendary David Munrow.

Included in the performers is Christopher Hogwood on harpsichord and regal, a Renaissance reed organ. This is the movie sound track originally issued on an LP in the early 1970s but recently remastered for CD. The recording used is Testament SBT 1250.

David Simon.
American Library Association via Music Inside Out

For most of his working life, David Simon has been telling an epic story of the American city — one corner at a time. First on the pages of The Baltimore Sun, then in the books Homicide: Life on the Killing Streets and The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood.

But it was on television that David Simon found his biggest and most devoted audience. NBC’s Homicide: Life on the Street and HBO’s The Corner and The Wire presented crime and punishment in an entirely new way. Detectives and criminals became extraordinarily ordinary people.

Sumer Is Icumen In (also called the Summer Canon and the Cuckoo Song) is a medieval English round song of the mid-13th century. This rota is the oldest known musical composition featuring six-part polyphony and is possibly the oldest surviving example of independent melodic counterpoint.

It will be featured on this week's Continuum along with other 13th century English music. CD recordings used will be Sumer Is Icumen In (The Hilliard Ensemble) - Chandos CHAN 9396, and Miri It Is (The Dufay Collective) - Harmonia Mundi HMA 1951154.

Music Inside Out

From the earliest days of motion pictures, music has played a crucial role in setting the mood for movies. Just take a look at the clip (above) of the final moments of Charlie Chaplin’s 1936 film “Modern Times.”

It’s hard to imagine that scene without the song “Smile.”

Girls Rock summer camp participants.
Nina Feldman / WWNO

Let me tell you about this cool, new band. You may not have heard of them yet — they’re called Sorrow Sap. They’re from New Orleans, and they have a fresh new sound… which might be because they started playing together earlier this week.

Oh, and they’re all under the age of 16.

At first, there wasn’t a name for the kind of music that Fats Domino played.

He called it rhythm and blues. But Domino’s songs stretched beyond that category.

In the late 1940s, Domino was working at a mattress factory in New Orleans and playing piano at night. He’d just gotten married… and both his waistline and fan base were expanding. That’s when the bandleader Billy Diamond first called him “Fats” — and predicted he’d have an outsized career.

This week, Continuum will feature The Queen’s Delight, a special music program devoted to the 17th century English ballads and dances of the time of Elizabeth I.

You’ll hear music by John Dowland, William Byrd, Thomas Robinson and, of course, the inimitable Anonymous, performed by members of The King’s Noyse early music ensemble.

CD recordings used will be The Queen's Delight (The King's Noyse) - harmonia mundi 907180; and, Songs & Dances from Shakespeare (The Broadside Band) - Saydisc CD-SDL 400

Dr. James Boldin, associate professor of music at the University of Louisiana at Monroe, recently published “Solo Duet Training for Horns,” a collection of instructive duets for the French horn.

The unicorn is a legendary animal that has been described since antiquity. But it is also the name of an outstanding early music ensemble from Austria.

This week on Continuum you'll hear music from three of the Unicorn Ensemble's CDs, including the Cantigas de Santa Maia of Alfonso X and the 12th century Carmina Burana. CDs used are Alfonso X, Cantigas de Santa Maria - Naxos 8.553133; Carmina Burana - Naxos 8.554837; and Chominciamento di Gioia - Naxos 8.553131