music

Continuum this week presents a program called The Cries of London, referring to the short lyrical and musical calls of merchants hawking their products and services at the beginning of the 17th century. Many street cries were incorporated into larger musical works, preserving them from oblivion.

This week on Inside the Arts, the Gambit 2016 Tribute to the Classical Arts honors the best in classical music, opera and dance at its annual luncheon benefiting the Foundation for Entertainment, Development and Education.

We talk with classical pianist Dr. Wilfred Delphin, alumnus and artist-in-residence in the Department of Music at Xavier University. Delphin is receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award.

Photo Credit: Greg Miles

This week on Inside the Arts, conversation with Grammy Award winning musician Irvin Mayfield on the premiere of #__________ Lives Matter. Mayfield and the 19-piece New Orleans Jazz Orchestra will perform the original composition, which aims to generate conversations about race and violence in America.

Then, on a much lighter note a classic fairy tale, Sleeping Beauty comes to Le Petit Theatre in the form of an American panto. Its slapstick humor and interactive fun for audiences of all ages.

Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m.

Mardi Gras was still close to three weeks away. But on Saturday afternoon, Jan. 16, the French Quarter was gridlocked with costumed frolickers, a massive, glittery throng radiating out through the narrow streets from the historic traditional-jazz venue Preservation Hall. The occasion? A parade in memory of David Bowie, led by the Preservation Hall Jazz Band.

This week on Continnum Milton Scheuermann and Thais St. Julien present examples of the first forms of polyphony, music composed for two or more melodies performed at the same time.

Rickie Lee Jones.
MusicInsideOut.org

Rickie Lee Jones says she moved to New Orleans, in part, because she wanted to be around people. In Los Angeles, she was mostly around cars.

So far, so good. People from New Orleans — either real or imagined — are all over her latest effort, “The Other Side of Desire.” And one of Jones’ neighbors here even helped inspire a song on the album.

A program of music of some of the most famous German minnesingers is presented on this Continuum. The minnesingers are the German counterpart of the medieval French troubadours and trouveres.

George Porter, Jr.
MusicInsideOut.org

When George Porter, Jr. was a child, he wanted to become a Catholic priest. But an uncomfortably silent church retreat and an encounter with neighborhood blues musicians helped Porter find his musical calling.

He turned to funk and never looked back.

As the bass player for The Meters, Porter helped create a body of music in the 1960s and 70s that still resonates as some of the funkiest grooves ever recorded.

So what’s the secret to funk?

Continuum this week will present a special New Year's program of early music, both sacred and secular. The sacred music is primarily from the Manuscrit du Puy, which brings together a varied group of Aquitanian monodic and polyphonic chants for the New Year from the 12th to the 16th centuries.

This week on Continuum you'll hear excerpts from the Feast of Fools, a post-European Christmas event dating from the Middle Ages. Occurring between Christmas and Epiphany, this celebration was marked by much license and buffoonery. The clergy and the laity traded places for a day and interesting things happened, particularly in The Mass of the Ass.

You'll hear it from these CDs: The Feast of Fools (The New London Consort) L’Oiseaus-Lyre 433 194-2, and La Fete de L'Ane (Clemencic Consort) Harmonia Mundi HMT 7901036.

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