music

Continuum presents excepts of recordings by The Boston Camerata. The ensemble became very active beginning in 1974 under the direction of Joel Cohen and remains to be one of the oldest early music ensembles in the U.S. Besides the usual early music repertoire the ensemble also has recorded early New World American music, heard on this program.

Hard Road Pictures

‘Levee Acoustics’ is an outdoor, acoustic music video series that highlights local musicians and physical landmarks in New Orleans. Each performance takes place somewhere on or near or the levee along the Mississippi River, honoring the significance of the waterway that snakes its way throughout the city. The musicians choose their own material and location to play along the Mississippi, giving them the chance to honor a site that is meaningful on a personal level, and offer their audience a more intimate look into sources of spatial inspiration.

This Continuum features Baroque music mostly by Spanish composers and in a variety of performing manners, including ensembles, vocal soloists and instrumentalists. The music is not from the usual Baroque repertoire normally heard. Recordings used are: Rebelo and Melgas (The Sixteen, Harry Christopher) - Collins Digital 14652, Spanish Baroque Music (Figueras, Savall & Koopman) - Philips 432 822-2, Juan Manuel de la Puente (Al Eyre Espano) - Almaviva DSI 0102, and Poema Harmonico (Hopkinson Smith) - Astree E8722

David Egan.
Denny Culbert

Our afternoon with David Egan at KRVS in Lafayette is one of my favorite afternoons, ever. Having listened to nearly all of what he’d written or recorded, I’d come from New Orleans with an iPod filled with Egan songs and a pile of questions.

The music of the two most important known medieval composers are featured on this Continuum, They are Guillaume de Machaut (1300-1377) and Guillaume Dufay (1397-1474). Machaut is the first known composer of music for a sacred liturgical mass and Dufay composed music that is considered the first important compositions leading into the Renaissance period. On the program are excerpts from Machaut’s Mass of Notre Dame and Dufay’s many secular music compositions.

Tom McDermott.
Gregg Goldman / Music Inside Out

The day we visited Tom McDermott’s home, the sound of James Booker’s “Classified” greeted us. It was a sweet gesture: walking into a man’s home to the sound of your radio show’s theme music.

McDermott knows how to communicate with a piano.

Blame it on Rio… and ragtime. McDermott has a piano playing style that smacks of sweet melodies, savory harmonies, and spicy Brazilian rhythm. And he serves up all three this hour. Pull up a chair, and enjoy.  

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

One of our favorite foods here in Louisiana is raw oysters. Oysters are also the favorite place to hang out for a couple of bacteria that are very unfriendly to human beings. Notwithstanding, few people in Louisiana has gotten sick from a raw oyster in some time. The reason for that is a company called AmeriPure. AmeriPure kills the bad bacteria in oysters without affecting the oyster’s taste.

Plus, salad dressings and Spotify.

Carlos Miguel Prieto.
Peter Schaaf / Music Inside Out

  Carlos Miguel Prieto says he can’t dance and he’s no good at golf. Those may be the only pursuits that elude him. As a youngster, growing up in Mexico City, he wanted to play violin. So, he did. As a teenager, he wanted to become an engineer. So, he did. As a young man, he wanted to run a business. So, he did. And, in the 1990s, Prieto decided to give up industry and become a symphony conductor. So far, so good.

“I’ve been doing it for about 20 years now and I thought maybe at some point I’m not going to love it as much as I do now,” he told Gwen recently. “I still do.”

Photo Credit: Rahav Segev

This week on Inside the Arts, we talk with renowned violin virtuoso Regina Carter. The multi-genre violinist will perform works from her most recent release, Southern Comfort, in concert at the Contemporary Arts Center.

This Continuum presents a program of music inspired by four medieval gardens, namely; The Garden of Zephirus, The Garden of Earthly Delights, Dreams in the Pleasure Garden, and Dance in the Garden of Mirth. Four different early music ensembles perform this delightful music.

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