music

Tonight on Jazz New Orleans with Fred Kasten (8 p.m. – 10 p.m. Central on 89.9 WWNO and streaming live at wwno.org) – An extended conversation with bass great Christian McBride, our Jazz New Orleans “Player of the Week” – and will play Jazz Fest with his Big Band, featuring vocalists Dianne Reeves and Jeffrey Osborne, on Sunday, May 3.

Zack Smith / Music Inside Out

Onstage, they don’t look like a traditional rock ‘n roll band. Sure, the seven members of Sweet Crude are kinda young and kinda scrawny and their clothes suggest a GAP-meets-Garanimals flare.

But they carry no guitars. Five of them play percussion. And yes, there’s a glockenspiel in the mix.

Sweet Crude sounds different too. They produce a sophisticated mixture of rhythm, classical strings, and musical theater that’s highly danceable and even educational. That’s because the band sings in English and Louisiana French – a language they’re learning on the job.

Scott Aiges

New Orleans is right in the middle of Jazz Fest, which features plenty of live music.

But there is also an associated event called the Sync Up Conference, now in its eighth year, designed for independent artists to learn more about the business of music.

WWNO’s Paul Maassen spoke with Scott Aiges, Programs Director for the Jazz and Heritage Foundation, about the conference.

The "La, La, La, La"  name of this week's Continuum program is based on the names of the four CDs featured on the program, all beginning with "La."

These are four very different selections of early music, each with a different early music ensemble. The CDs used are: La Folia (Jordi Savall et al) - Alia Vox AV 9805; La Messe  des Fous (Barry Hayward Consort) - BNL BNL112746; La Dolce Vita (King's Singers & Tragicomedia) - EMI CDC  7 541 91 2; and La Bele Marie (Anonymous 4) - Harmonia Mundi HMU 907312.

One of Lafayette’s rising stars, blues rocker Lane Mack, released his self-titled debut earlier this month, and it hit No. 2 on the iTunes blues charts.

After his son was born, Mack says he wanted to record a collection of his own songs rooted in the blues and Cajun music he was raised on.


Eve Troeh / WWNO

Crowds filled the Fairgrounds as the 46th annual New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival started its annual seven days of festing.

From a homegrown showcase for local talent, Jazz Fest has grown to include top national pop stars (which the festival officially calls “guest artists") alongside New Orleans' favorite jazz, blues, rock, gospel, hip hop, brass band and other talent. The nonprofit Jazz and Heritage Foundation has produced the festival in partnership with international production company AEG since 2004.

This week on Jazz New Orleans with Fred Kasten (Fridays from 8–10 p.m. Central on 89.9 WWNO and streaming live at wwno.org) — An extended conversation with pianist and composer Monty Alexander, the Jazz New Orleans “Player of the Week.” Alexander will play Jazz Fest with his Harlem-Kingston Express on Thursday, April 30.

The instrumental consort music of English 17th century composer Anthony Holborne will be featured this week on Continuum.

You'll hear many of his dances, including pavans, galliards and almaynes with interesting titles including "The Honeysuckle" and "The Fairie Round." The outstanding performances will be given by The King's Noyse under the director of David Douglas.

Recording used is: My Selfe - The Music of Anthony Holborne (The King's Noyse) - Harmonia Mundi HMU 907238.

This week on Jazz New Orleans with Fred Kasten (Fridays, 8–10 p.m.

Guillaume Laurent / Flickr

Consider the musicians.

After the crowd goes home, after they pack their gear and instruments, when their van rolls through the night and the smell of smoke still lingers on their clothes, the bottom line remains. The business of music never sleeps.

Artist royalties, mechanical royalties, revenue streams and recording contracts occupy the minds and sleepless nights of managers and artists the country over as they head to their next gig.

You could fill a college course with everything an artist needs to know. Trust us, they have.

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