Music

Despite the throngs of tourists and ever-growing parade of festivals, New Orleans’ nightlife can be surprisingly intimate. The corner bar is often the anchor of a neighborhood’s social life, where friends, strangers, and familiar faces can share drinks, stories, dreams, and failures.

Dreamers Then and Now

Jun 5, 2018

This week, Continuum features The Queen’s Delight, a special music program devoted to the 17th century English ballads and dances of the time of Elizabeth I. You’ll hear music by John Dowland, William Byrd, Thomas Robinson and, of course, the inimitable Anonymous, performed by members of The King’s Noyse early music ensemble. Also included are songs and dances from Shakespeare performed by The Broadside Band.

Musicians make great teachers and Music Inside Out is shining a light on some of our favorite faculty:

“Half-shot, hot spot, fleshpot, mascot, young Scott, slingshot.” Singer-songwriter AJ Croce, says that a rhyming dictionary can be a songwriter’s best friend. When Croce listens to a song on the radio, he can sometimes figure out which dictionary the songwriter used. Check out Croce’s video, “Right on Time,” which features his writing process.  

Thanks to the generosity of our listeners during our Spring Memberfest and Give NOLA Day, we've recently been able to add some new and vintage recordings to our Classical 104.9 FM music library.

While some performances are from 2017 and 2018, we've also found some classic recordings from decades past -- they're all a welcome addition to our growing music library.

James Arey will highlight a full hour of these new recordings on Friday morning, June 1, at 9:00am on Classical New Orleans.

Creoles and Cowgirls

May 29, 2018

We hit up Preservation Hall in the French Quarter for a potent dose of trad jazz, as bandleader and fourth-generation Creole musician Charlie Gabriel tells of his Caribbean roots, jazz funerals, and New Orleans’ hybrid rhythms. Then we head to the Lonestar state to hear the reworking of jazz into Texas swing, as played by the Quebe Sisters. The fiddling siblings tell of their sheltered upbringing outside Ft. Worth and their fiery baptism into western swing.

The unicorn is a legendary animal that has been described since antiquity. But it is also the name of an outstanding early music group from Europe, The Unicorn Ensemble, heard on this Continuum. The musicians are from Austria, Italy and Germany and specialize in playing historical instruments in fascinating programs, full of variety and played with artistry and great refinement.

As a child, Jason Marsalis watched old television shows as much for the music as for anything the characters were doing onscreen. 

“I became a big fan of reruns of the tv show, The Monkees,” he tells Gwen. “My father thought it was just hilarious that I was into this. But when I look back on it, that was music from the 1960s.”

Memorial Day with the NEA National Heritage Fellows

May 22, 2018

This Memorial Day, we celebrate the artists and artisans keeping American roots cultures alive. Every year since 1982 the National Endowment for the Arts has presented Heritage fellowships— America’s highest honor in “folk & traditional arts.” We hear music from past award recipients including swamp boogie chanteuse Carol Fran and bluegrass crooner Del McCoury.

Continuum this week presents part two of a program devoted to music from Ottaviano Petrucci's historic music publication, "Harmonice Musices Odhecaton," the first printed sheet music document, published in 1501. Petrucci (1466-1530) was the first to publish a collection of printed music of the period using movable type. Included in the selections are chansons, frottole, popular Italian dances & sacred music from that printed collection. Recordings used are: Petrucci - The First Printer of Music (N.Y. Pro Musica) - Copy of LP Decca DL 79435 and Praetorious / Susato (N.Y.

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