Music

Continuum this week presents part two of a program devoted to music from Ottaviano Petrucci's historic music publication, "Harmonice Musices Odhecaton," the first printed sheet music document, published in 1501. Petrucci (1466-1530) was the first to publish a collection of printed music of the period using movable type. Included in the selections are chansons, frottole, popular Italian dances & sacred music from that printed collection. Recordings used are: Petrucci - The First Printer of Music (N.Y. Pro Musica) - Copy of LP Decca DL 79435 and Praetorious / Susato (N.Y.

Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong / Louis Armstrong

Perhaps one of the most awe-inspiring facts about Ricky Riccardi, who directs research collections at the Louis Armstrong House Museum Collection in Queens, is that he never argued with his parents. 

Blues, Old, New & Beyond

May 15, 2018

We trace the musical DNA and psychic aura of the blues from its Delta roots to Chicago’s electric pioneers, across a patchwork of regional styles and modern day innovators. In an archival interview we talk with blues rockers the Black Keys of Akron, Ohio, about defying genre, eschewing nostalgia, and the blues progenitors who blurred labels like primitive and avant-garde.

Continuum this week presents a program of dances from medieval times to the present performed by a wandering minstrel ensemble called "Wolgemut". They perform historical music on original instruments such as the medieval bagpipes, shawms and bombastic drums as well as quiet instruments like the flute, medieval fiddle and harp. Founded in Berlin, Germany, they have performed throughout the United States and Europe since 1997. They pride themselves on providing high quality entertainment guaranteed to leave the audience "in a good mood", which happens to be the translation of Wolgemut!

Bruce Boyd Raeburn is known to most people as the curator of the William Ransom Hogan Jazz Archive at Tulane University, a position he held from 1989 until his retirement on January 1, 2018.

On Continuum this week will be a special program devoted Gregorian Chant, from a ten-CD set of the History of Music. Specifically, this volume covers musical Europe in the era of Gregorian unification. Gregorian chant developed mainly in western and central Europe during the 9th and 10th centuries, with later additions and redactions. Although popular legend credits Pope St. Gregory the Great with inventing Gregorian chant, scholars believe that it arose from a later Carolingian synthesis of Roman chant and Gallican chant.

“Everything in life is governed by rhythm,” says Herlin Riley, “Everything. (And) when you play the drums, the rhythms are quicker.”

The Killer, the Thriller, and the Chiller

May 1, 2018

From backwoods Louisiana to Beale Street, from hellfire to honky tonk, we trace the meteoric rise, fall and rebound of rocknroll’s most wayward son—Jerry Lee Lewis. We talk to the Killer about his hits, his misses and being the last man standing of rock’s originators. Jerry Lee’s sister Frankie Jean Lewis, a.k.a. the Chiller, gives us a tour of the family’s homestead in Ferriday, La. Bluesman Hezekiah Early shares memories of Haney’s Big House, the Chitlin’ Circuit nightclub where underage Jerry Lee sneaked in to hear boogie woogie. Drummer J.M.

This week on Continuum you’ll hear two very different performances of the earliest known song cycle, Cantigas de Amigo, (Songs of a Friend) by the mid 13th century Galician-Portuguese troubadour composer, Martin Codax. These love songs were composed to be sung by women. This is one of the few collections of medieval compositions by a known composer, of whom almost nothing is known. But, obviously he is very special to his present countrymen since Martin Codax wine is one of the best being produced in Galicia today!

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