in memoriam

President George W. Bush visits the restored Dooky Chase Restaurant in 2008 with Leah Chase, left, and Dooky Chase, right.
Joyce N. Boghosian / The White House

Edgar "Dooky" Chase, Jr., the patriarch of the Chase family who passed away at the end of 2016, helped in making Dooky Chase’s Restaurant the landmark establishment it is today. Here, his wife of 70 years, Chef Leah Chase, shares memories of her husband, his life as a musician and the quiet role he played behind the scenes in the Civil Rights movement.


Terry Flettrich Rohe on the set of WDSU's "Midday" show, a popular news-talk program, which she produced and hosted.
Courtesy of Dominic Massa / WWL-TV

Terry Flettrich Rohe, a New Orleans broadcast pioneer and beloved host of WDSU's "Mrs. Muffin's Birthday Party" passed away on Thursday. In addition to co-creating and hosting the children's show in the 1950s, Rohe was producer and host of the network's popular "Midday" show.


About 200 people gathered at The Pavilion of the Two Sisters in City Park on Sunday for a memorial to cultural activist Sharon Litwin. 

  Leaders of the groups she helped over the years turned out to honor the British native who embraced New Orleans.

NEW ORLEANS -- Noted New Orleans sportswriter Peter Finney has died.

He passed away Saturday at his home. Finney was 88.

The New Orleans Advocate reports that Finney’s career spanned seven decades. He began with the New Orleans States Item in the summer of 1945, covering American Legion baseball shortly after graduating from Jesuit High School.

Sharon Litwin, co-founder of NolaVie.
NolaVie.com

WWNO has lost a dear member of its community in Sharon Litwin, co-founder and president of NolaVie. She passed away Friday, June 24, 2016. 

Sharon played an important role in the growth of WWNO's local news and cultural reporting. Our listeners are invited to join a public celebration of her life at 1:00 p.m. on Sunday, August 21, 2016 at the Pavilion of the Two Sisters in New Orleans City Park.

Sharon Litwin.
NolaVie.com

A driving force behind the arts and cultural communities in New Orleans has passed away. 


A New Orleans expert on Constitutional law says the death over the weekend of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia leaves an enormous void in the nation’s justice system. That void may be around for a while.

Mardi Gras was still close to three weeks away. But on Saturday afternoon, Jan. 16, the French Quarter was gridlocked with costumed frolickers, a massive, glittery throng radiating out through the narrow streets from the historic traditional-jazz venue Preservation Hall. The occasion? A parade in memory of David Bowie, led by the Preservation Hall Jazz Band.

K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen staff photo, 1981.
Courtesy of Frank Brigtsen

Chef Paul Prudhomme changed the American food world forever with his creative, exuberant love for Creole and Cajun food. He was the first American chef to take the reins at Commander's Palace — where the world first had a taste of his culinary genius. He pioneered the now commonplace farm-to-table movement, as he championed Louisiana's farmers and fishermen. As Ella Brennan said, “He had magic in his hands.”

Chef Prudhomme and Chef Frank Brigtsen, passing the skillet outside of Brigtsen's Restaurant, 1986.
Courtesy of Frank Brigtsen

As we reach the end of 2015, we're taking a look back at the triumphs and tragedies of the year past.

2015 was a big year for Louisiana Eats! This June, we celebrated our fifth anniversary on the air, with listeners and friends including the NPR affiliates WWNO, WRKF, KRVS and Red River Radio. We found ourselves traveling across the state, the country and the world, covering topics ranging from substance abuse in the service industry, revelry and tradition at the annual Blackpot Festival in Lafayette, ghosts in the attic at Tujague's Restaurant, seafood innovation on the Gulf Coast and the domestic slave trade in America.

Pages