The Advocate marked the launch of its daily New Orleans edition Monday, as the newspaper moves to fill in a pending void created by The Times-Picayune's decision to publish three days a week.

The Advocate reports it will distribute free copies of the edition across the city this week, then roll out home delivery and sales beginning Oct. 1. The goal is to distribute 10,000 copies across the greater New Orleans area, to 35 zip codes and 400 single copy locations. As of Friday, The Advocate's publisher, David Manship, said there are just over 2,000 subscribers in New Orleans.

Reinforcing some things you might have suspected, the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism and Internet & American Life Project, along with the Knight Foundation, report today that a national telephone survey of adults finds:

If you've been watching the HBO series Treme with us, welcome back.

If you're new here, welcome in the first place. WBGO's Josh Jackson, a New Orleans native, and I have been watching the music-saturated program set in post-Katrina New Orleans for two years now. After every episode, we try to establish some context for the many musical references and live performances the show features.



I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now, we're going to focus on a new study about the people who decide what you see on America's television news. The National Association of Black Journalists, or NABJ, has just released its latest diversity census. The group says the picture is bleak for journalists of color who hope to get into television newsroom management. That's journalists who belong to all different ethnic groups.

Note: A shorter version of this story aired on your local member station.

Fifty years ago this month, Life magazine published its take on the 100 most promising young professionals of the midcentury. The special issue, titled "The Take-Over Generation," highlighted some of the "young movers and shakers of the country," Roy Rowan, the magazine's assistant managing editor at the time, tells reporter Richard L. Harris.

WWNO, The Lens shift collaborative strategy to play to strengths

Sep 13, 2012

The University of New Orleans, which operates WWNO, today announced revised plans to support a collaborative, nonprofit multimedia news operation, expanding the reporting role of The Lens and increasing the NPR affiliate’s focus on news and cultural information.

Mitt Romney's rally in Mansfield, Ohio, on Monday began the way every political event begins. "Please stand for the Pledge of Allegiance and our country's national anthem."

This is always an uncomfortable moment for me. While I sat at my laptop, most of the reporters around me stood and put their hands over their hearts. This time instead of just sitting and working, I tweeted what I was feeling:

The John S. and James L.

The publisher of Baton Rouge's daily newspaper says it is gearing up for a move into the New Orleans market.

Beginning Oct. 1, The Advocate plans to begin delivery of a new New Orleans edition of the paper. The move comes shortly after a decision by The Times-Picayune, which is owned by Advance Publications Inc., to convert the 175-year-old New Orleans daily to a 24-hour digital news operation with a print edition only on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays.

The News-Star newspaper in Monroe has sued the Louisiana Department of Education over a denied Freedom of Information request.

The News-Star reports that it took the legal action after the Education Department first ignored and then denied the request, claiming the governor's exemption of deliberative process.

The complaint was filed Friday. It gives only one side of the legal argument.