media

NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune says it will be closing the newspaper’s pressroom in late 2015 or early 2016.

The New Orleans paper will be printed in Mobile, Alabama.

The move will eliminate 100 jobs at the company, which prints and packages the newspaper.

NOLA Media Group, which operates the website and publishes the newspaper, says news and ad sales staffs will remain the same.

Its news staff of 165 includes 95 reporters. Fifty-seven freelancers also contribute to the website and newspaper.

Francesca Lyman

The 24th Annual Society of Environmental Journalists conference took place in New Orleans last week, bringing to town a few hundred environmental reporters, advocates, scientists, engineers, politicians and more.

Participants got out of the conference rooms to see the levees, bayous, marshes, sinkholes, refineries and rivers that all contribute to the complex region that is Louisiana’s Gulf coast.

Retired columnist Angus Lind's news beat was decidedly upbeat compared to the grave stories he followed as a young man in the 1970's.
The Historic New Orleans Collection

Angus Lind’s column in The Times-Picayune documented things that he described as, “a little offbeat”:  people, places and events that gave New Orleans its local color. But that didn’t come until later in his career. When he got started in the early 1970s as a young man, Angus was a general-assignment reporter who cut his teeth on a series of tragic events within a single calendar year.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

Common sense is difficult to define. In business, people with unique and quirky ideas can run into a lot of negativity based on "common sense." Like the guys who decided that, at a time when newspapers are going under all over the country, they're going to launch a brand new daily newspaper in New Orleans. Crazy, right?

That newspaper is The Advocate. Its editor, Peter Kovacs, who was canned by the Times-Picayune in its business realignment to a 3-day-a-week paper, is Peter's guest on this episode of Out to Lunch.

The New York Times' new executive editor, Dean Baquet, took over just two weeks ago, yet he appears perfectly comfortable in his perch atop the worlds of journalism and New York. He smokes fine cigars to relax, wears elegant loafers and excuses his decision to keep his suit coat on during our conversation by saying that's just who he is.

But Baquet's identity is wrapped up in a city and a different reality more than 1,000 miles away.

Haxorjoe / Wikimedia

New Orleans native Dean Baquet has been named executive editor of The New York Times. He is replacing Jill Abramson, who has been in the position for two and a half years.

The company didn't give a reason for the change.

Baquet, who received a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting in 1988, has worked for the Times for seven years. He would be the first African-American to hold the newspaper's highest editorial position.

Baquet began his newspaper career in New Orleans at the The States-Item and later worked for the The Times-Picayune. 
 

Jessica Spengler / Flickr

Over the past twenty years, conversations about food have entered mainstream American culture. On this week's Louisiana Eats! we'll hear how food has grown in the newsrooms and classrooms of American society with food writer Brett Anderson and professor Elizabeth Engelhardt.

Louisiana Healthcare Journal started in Baton Rouge, then launched a publication in New Orleans in 2011.

It has been publishing in Little Rock since November, and now the Baton Rouge-based enterprise is looking to move into markets farther afield.


It's sort of a fluke.

The Baton Rouge paper had been nursing its 1950s era letterpresses for years when it finally had to bite the bullet and invest in a new production facility. The speedy offset press came online in 2006, just as the country headed into a recession and the newspaper industry was tanking.

So when John Georges closed the deal to buy The Advocate in May, it came with one of the newest printing presses in the country.


R.T. Scott talks with John Georges, the new publisher of The Advocate which is producing an edition to compete with the Times-Pic in New Orleans, and Rolfe McCollister, publisher of the Baton Rouge Business report, about what the changes mean for readers in Baton Rouge.

Audio will be available by approximately 11 a.m. Tuesday, June 11.

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