mardi gras 2018

Jessica Rosgaard

On this week's edition of "All Things New Orleans" we're talking all things Mardi Gras! First, we'll get a quick lesson on bead history; from precious throws to the controversial "Forever Lee Circle" beads. Then, Tegan Wendland chats with Dani Galloway, interim head of the Department of Public Works. They'll talk about city officials' plan to protect gutters from unwanted beads and trash along the parade route.  

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: An update on the bug destroying the bird’s foot marsh, some research from the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science conference and the environmental consequences of glitter.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Countries across the world are starting to ban some microplastics. Like microbeads — the tiny pieces of plastic used in soap and face washes.

 

This time of year in New Orleans, it’s almost raining plastic, from beads to glitter. Lots of glitter. But what happens to all that sparkly stuff after it washes away? WWNO’s Travis Lux took a look at the environmental consequences of glitter.

Beads are sorted and resold at ARC of Greater New Orleans.
Jessica Rosgaard / WWNO

Although Mardi Gras is all about excess, the piles of abandoned beads, cups and recyclable trash left in a parade's wake are nothing to celebrate. In fact, a staggering statistic emerged a few weeks ago — city workers found 93,000 pounds of Mardi Gras beads clogging New Orleans catch basins.