mardi gras

The Charles L. Franck Studio Collection / The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a retrospective look at Mardi Gras, and the year that carnival took place in the dark. Hear the TriPod Xtras extended interview with Rien Fertel. 

Right now, you might not be itching for Mardi Gras, since it just happened and everything, but imagine what it will feel like six months from now when you haven’t caught any beads, or a shoe, or a light up clicky thing, and still have another six months to go. It can be rough.

The Charles L. Franck Studio Collection / The Historic New Orleans Collection

Tripod Xtras feature one on one interviews with special guests. This week’s TriPod episode focuses on Mardi Gras 1946 and the strike of the flambeaux carriers that left the major parades rolling with little to no light at all. This is an extended interview with Rien Fertel, writer, teacher, and historian from Louisiana. Rien just

Duane And Susan Hoff
Reggie Morris

It’s Carnival time in Louisiana! On this week's show, we're talking Mardi Gras traditions with newcomers and locals alike. 

To begin, we learn some surprises about the Krewe of Mid-City, a very local parading organization that is about to be graced by an expected king and queen. Originally from Minnesota, business moguls Duane and Susan Hoff are the owners of Fantesca Estate and Winery in Napa Valley. About to take their thrones, we visit with Duane and Susan to find out how they came to reign over this community-focused krewe.

Eugenie Saussaye, a French immigrant who founded the Vieux Carre Hair Shop in 1877.
Vieux Carre Hair Shop / Vieux Carre Hair Shop

Bill Saussaye’s family has helped decorate Mardi Gras krewes for generations. His family’s shop, the Vieux Carre Hair Shop, is not only a destination for the kings and captains of Mardi Gras, but a catalyst for keeping festival traditions alive and well.

The Vieux Carre Hair Shop was founded in 1877 by Bill Saussaye’s great-grandmother, Eugenie. The shop is now located Uptown on Maple Street and has extended hours for the Mardi Gras season. This interview was conducted by Mark Cave for the Historic New Orleans Collection and produced for WWNO by Thomas Walsh. 

Ian McNulty / WWNO

As parades roll and people hit the streets for Carnival revelry, street food blossoms everywhere.

Star-Steppin' Cosmonaughties Headed For Funky Times

Jan 27, 2016
Kelley Crawford

When it comes to Mardi Gras, you can never understate the difference between watching a parade and marching in one. The experience is so alluring that it’s no surprise many krewes get bigger and bigger each year. Take for example, The Star-Steppin’ Cosmonaughties: a dancing krewe now in their fifth year, that’s ready for Carnival season with new moves and big surprises.

StoryCorps

Conversation by conversation, interview by interview, StoryCorps collects the stories and voices of our time. This week, Littdell “Queen B” Banister and Mary Jones give us a snapshot into the lives of the Mardi Gras Indians, where personal pride is sewn into every stitch of their annual suits.

The Krewe of 'tit Rǝx — the Mardi Gras "microkrewe" made up of tiny, shoebox-sized floats — will roll through the Marigny on Feb. 7.

Pronounced TEET-Rex (as in "petite," the French word for "small"), the krewe will reprise their 2014 route, beginning at 5 p.m. behind the St. Roch Market on St. Claude Ave., then proceeding through the streets of the Marigny before arriving at the Allways Lounge for the organization's annual Ping Pong Ball.

A trial date has been set for a civil rights case against state police who tackled two young African American men during last year’s Mardi Gras.

The federal case drew claims of excessive force and criticism of the troopers involved.

The New Orleans Advocate reports the incident was captured on surveillance video two days before Mardi Gras.

It prompted an internal State Police investigation that cleared all the officers involved.

anthony posey / Flickr

The Advocate reports that a federal hearing Monday may show who’s legally entitled to use the Zulu Mardi Gras krewe’s name on Facebook.

Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club Inc. filed suit against a former associate member for trademark infringement. The lawsuit says the man set up a “Zulu Mardi Gras” Facebook page, and used club trademarks without permission in an attempt to sell invitations to the Zulu Mardi Gras ball, spots on a Zulu float, and one of the club’s coveted coconut throws.

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