lower 9th ward

Eve Abrams / WWNO

Since its formation in 2006, the Lower 9th Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development has worked hard to advocate for a healthier, more sustainable Lower 9th Ward.

“We are in the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans, Louisiana,” declares Arthur Johnson, CEO of the Lower 9th Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development. “This is on the Holy Cross side. The river is right on my right. I can see the tall ships from here.  That’s how close we are to the river.

A third man and a woman have been arrested in connection with a drive-by shooting in the Lower 9th Ward that killed two people and injured five.

Two boys and their mother were among the wounded.

New Orleans police say 23-year-old Joseph Nelson III is accused of being one of two gunmen who fired into a group on Aug. 10. Police say 25-year-old Ashley Shorts allegedly helped one of those two avoid detection.

Nelson was booked yesterday with two counts of first-degree murder and five of attempted first-degree murder.

Jesse Hardman

Every week WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week's topic is, once again, violence in New Orleans.

On August 10, 2014, two people were killed and five were injured in a drive-by shooting in the Lower 9th Ward. Two children were severely wounded in the incident

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

New Orleans officials are asking the public for help in finding the gunman who killed two people and injured five others in a weekend drive-by shooting. Police have made some progress in the investigation.

Hanna Rasanen

If you’ve ever driven through the Lower 9th Ward, you know that there is lots of land out there.

On this week’s Notes from New Orleans Sharon Litwin catches up with Lower Nine gardener Jenga Mwendo of the Backyard Gardeners Network about putting vacant lots to use and what’s been happening in her neighborhood since the last time the two of them talked.  

To read more about the Backyard Gardeners Network, visit NolaVie.com.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp.” Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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