lower 9th ward

Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Fri June 6, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: James Stram

James Stram.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Thu June 5, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: George Barisich

George Barisich.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Wed June 4, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Greg Miller

Greg Miller.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Read more
Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Tue June 3, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: John Taylor

John Taylor.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp.” Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Read more
Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
9:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?

Destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned the Bayou Bienvenue freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, leaving mostly just open water.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Read more
Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Amanda Moore

Amanda Moore.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Latest News
7:00 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Lower 9th Ward Village Scrambles For Funding

The Lower 9th Ward Village community center building.
Credit Screen capture from Kickstarter

Ward "Mack" McClendon talks about financial problems hitting the Lower Ninth Ward Village.

The Lower 9th Ward Village community center has fallen on tough financial times. Supporters are looking for help in small ways, because big promises of funding have fallen apart.

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Community
7:00 am
Mon February 25, 2013

Lower Ninth Ward Releases Plan For Getting Fresh Food

A community effort to establish a fresh-food market in the Lower Ninth Ward is taking shape. The first step is in a new plan written by residents.

Residents discuss plan to get fresh food establishment in the neighborhood.

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Food
4:29 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Where Y'Eat: Making a Detour for Café Dauphine

Fried stuffed bell peppers at Cafe Dauphine.
Ian McNulty

In a neighborhood not known as a restaurant destination, a new family-run eatery presents both classic and original arguments for paying a visit.

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Latest News
10:00 am
Sat January 12, 2013

New Councilman Withdraws Katrina Tour Fee Proposal

A newly-elected New Orleans city councilman, whose district includes the Lower 9th Ward, has withdrawn a package of ordinances that would have required tour buses to pay special fees to access the neighborhood.

Councilman James Gray, who took office last month, says he needs more time to research the issue introduced by his predecessor.

Currently, the city has an ordinance in place that bans tour buses from the Lower 9th Ward. It was passed after Hurricane Katrina to keep tour buses from impeding cleanup and recovery efforts when levees failed during the 2005 storm.

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