Louisiana Supreme Court

The Louisiana Supreme Court has asked a Baton Rouge district judge to review his decision to throw out Gov. Bobby Jindal's revamp of teacher tenure and salary laws – called Act 1.

Judge Michael Caldwell had ruled that the legislation was unconstitutional because it bundled together too many items spanning Louisiana's education laws.

Louisiana’s Supreme Court has ruled that money reserved for public schools can’t be used to pay for private school tuition under the state constitution.

The 6-1 decision, handed down Tuesday, undermines the school voucher program that was a keystone of the education overhaul pushed through the legislature by Gov. Jindal last year.

In a written statement following the ruling, Jindal said the program is, “alive and well.” Nearly 5,000 students are enrolled at private schools through the voucher program. Roughly 8,000 students have been offered vouchers for next year.

Her honor Bernette J. Johnson was sworn in as Louisiana's first African American chief justice Friday morning. Johnson was only able to take her seat after two civil rights lawsuits.

Louisiana's Supreme Court ruled today that Justice Bernette Johnson has the seniority that entitles her to become the panel's chief justice at the end of January, NPR's Debbie Elliott tells our Newscast Desk.

Johnson will be the first African-American to sit in the chief justice's seat. The state's first Supreme Court was created in 1812.

Lawyers for Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Bernette Johnson are seeking more than $380,000 in attorneys' fees and expenses for work on her lawsuit over her bid to become the court's first black chief justice.

In a court filing Wednesday, Johnson's attorneys argue the amount they are seeking from the state of Louisiana is reasonable. U.S. District Judge Susie Morgan didn't immediately rule on the request.

A lawyer for Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal says a federal judge created confusion when she ruled in favor of state Supreme Court Justice Bernette Johnson's bid to become the court's next chief justice.

Kevin Tully, one of the state's attorneys, said in a statement Saturday that it's unclear whether U.S. District Judge Susie Morgan believes a 20-year-old federal court settlement prohibits the state's highest court from "carrying out its constitutional duties" and naming its next chief justice.

The State of Louisiana is appealing a judge's ruling that Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Bernette Johnson has the seniority that entitles her to become the court's next chief justice.

Friday's court filing by a lawyer representing Gov. Bobby Jindal's office asked the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to review U.S. District Judge Susie Morgan's ruling. Morgan sided with Johnson's bid to become the state's first black chief justice and succeed Justice Catherine Kimball when she retires in 2013.

Johnson had sued to block her colleagues from deciding the matter.

A federal judge is set to hold a hearing in the dispute over who will to be the next chief justice of Louisiana's Supreme Court.

Louisiana's constitution says the longest-serving of the seven justices must get the top spot.

Bernette Johnson has served on the court since 1994 but supporters of fellow justice Jeffrey Victory say Johnson's first years shouldn't count. She was elected from an appeals court district and assigned to the higher court under a civil rights lawsuit settlement.

Victory has served since 1995.

It's decision-time for anyone still on the fence about jumping into a race for Louisiana's Nov. 6 election.

Candidates must file paperwork this week if they want to run for office. Qualifying starts Wednesday morning and runs through Friday at 5 p.m.

Top of the ballot around the state will be Louisiana's six U.S. House seats, including one race between two Republican incumbents — Charles Boustany and Jeff Landry — who were forced into the same district when the state lost a congressional seat because of population adjustments.

A power struggle on the Louisiana Supreme Court is headed to federal court this week. Lawyers are seeking to reopen an old voting rights case that gave the Deep South state its first black Supreme Court justice. What's at stake in the racially charged fight is whether Louisiana will now have its first African-American chief justice.