Louisiana News

Stories from our partner stations around the state, including WRKF in Baton Rouge, KEDM in Monroe and Red River Radio in Shreveport.

One police officer has been fired, and another suspended following the 2016 fatal shooting of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge.

Sarah Gamard/LSU Manship School News Service

The Louisiana legislature has finished its first week of the regular session. Gov. John Bel Edwards laid out his legislative priorities in an address to the chamber on Monday. Edwards also appeared before the Senate Committee on Labor and Industrial Relations to support bills that would raise the state minimum wage and require state contractors to abide by the Equal Pay for Women Act.

Dr. Robert Twilley, LSU Oceanic Studies professor and director of the Louisiana Sea Grant program, it’s time to rethink the premises upon which Louisiana is basing its coastal restoration projects.

"I doubt those marsh creations are going to have more than a 20-year lifecycle without modifying the way we manage the river," he told members of the Governor’s Coastal Advisory Commission Tuesday.

This week we have the latest episode of WWNO’s community engagement project The Listening Post. To kick of 2017, the team asked folks around New Orleans about the stigma of mental health in their communities and what self-care tips they recommend for keeping it together.

The Listening Post's questions for January are:

What is the BIGGEST cause of stress in your life?

What self care methods do you rely on to combat stress? 

MGN Julie Cardona

About 67 percent of Louisana's eligible voters turned out to cast ballots on Election Day. The state's eight electoral votes went to the Republican nominee, Donald Trump, as expected. This week's All Things New Orleans dives deeper into down-ballot races in Louisiana.

The $438 million dollars already approved by Congress for flood recovery won't be enough to help all of the households that qualify as top priority.

This from the Restore Louisiana Task Force, which has announced a set of guidelines to prioritize the distribution of federal relief money to help Louisiana families recover from the devastating August floods.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

This week on All Things New Orleans, the Listening Post team asks local voters about the upcoming election and looks at the fate of 70,000 ineligible Louisiana voters. Tegan Wendland visits a new waterfront research center near the Port of New Orleans. Plus, Farrar Hudkins reflects on his 16 years as a WWNO announcer and classical music programmer.

Facebook photos compiled by takepart.com / takepart.com

This week on All Things New Orleans, City Council is expected to make its first vote on regulating short-term rentals, we’ll hear from both sides. We’ll take a look at how crowdfunding has changed the nature of disaster relief in light of the floods in south Louisiana.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Like any major disaster, when floods hit south Louisiana last month, big relief organizations streamed in - and people all over the world gave money. But it’s no longer just the big brand names of philanthropy that attract donations from afar. Crowdfunding has grown up, and now millions of dollars are funneled to small and specific causes. In Baton Rouge, it has changed the nature of flood relief efforts.

 

Kate Richardson

Right now, the Hispanic and Latino population in Baton Rouge is suffering with particular needs after the floods. Some of the problems are the same as those faced by Latino residents and workers after Katrina, and some are different. WWNO's "All Things New Orleans" asked Eduardo Courtade for insight on that situation, as well as other issues and events being talked about in the region's Spanish-speaking communities. He's Program Director for local stations Radio Tropical and La Fabulosa, which play music in addition to covering sports and news in Spanish.

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