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Devastating floods in Louisiana have left an estimated 40,000 houses damaged; some 86,000 people have applied for federal disaster aid in the wake of the disaster.

It's a crisis some people are comparing to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

The disaster area stretches over 20 parishes, Eileen Fleming of member station WWNO reports, and officials are working to determine how to provide temporary housing to meet the extreme need.

This week flooding in Louisiana killed at least 13 and damaged more than 40,000 homes. The disaster stopped life in its tracks for many across the state, including Louisiana’s second-biggest school system: East Baton Rouge Parish.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd checks in with the superintendent of that school system, Warren Drake, who says East Baton Rouge is hoping to resume school Wednesday.

Interview Highlights: Warren Drake

On the closure of East Baton Rouge Parish schools

Thousands of Louisianans remain in emergency shelters after devastating floods killed at least 13 people and damaged more than 40,000 homes this week.

Twenty Louisiana parishes have been declared federal disaster areas after what officials have called some of the worst flooding ever to hit the state. Tangipahoa Parish is one of those disaster areas, and it’s no stranger to sever flooding. This is the second 500-year flood to hit the parish in less than six months.

As flooding drenches parts of southern Louisiana, the city of New Orleans is sending help. 

Even as thousands of residents of southern Louisiana are returning to their flood-damaged homes, more danger could lie ahead as rain continues to fall and the full extent of the damage can't be known, according to state emergency response officials.

A home in the Brownfields neighborhood of Baton Rouge, August 17, 2016.
Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Floodwaters that have swamped at least 40,000 homes throughout south Louisiana have begun to recede, and people are returning to assess the devastation.

But returning to your home can be a dangerous, disgusting, heart-rending experience. Catherine Crowell, Director of Rebuilding Together New Orleans, has these tips on how to prepare for assessing, gutting and repairing your home after a flood disaster.

With all the floodwater in Louisiana, some may be worrying about whether the extremely wet conditions could attract mosquitos carrying the Zika virus. A leading expert says that’s not a main concern.

Federal officials are expanding a disaster declaration in Louisiana after devastating floods killed at least 11 people and caused widespread property damage.

Gov. John Bel Edwards announced Tuesday that 20 parishes are now under a disaster declaration with a "historic flood event" damaging some 40,000 homes and leading to the evacuation of 30,000 people from flood-soaked areas.

"Nobody has been forgotten," Edwards told reporters. "We understand there are still a lot of people who are suffering."

Gov. John Bel Edwards will hold a press conference at 11 a.m. Tuesday with FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate and the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness. WWNO will carry the event live.

Floods continue to impact wide swaths of Louisiana, and a long rebuilding process is ahead for tens of thousands of people. The Association of State Floodplain Managers released these tips on what to do to prepare before you repair.

 

DURING A FLOOD

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