jazz

John Boutté is hard to intimidate. He may be the only guy who has ever told Stevie Wonder that his singing was flat. Boutté's observation, during a chance encounter with Wonder, changed his life for good. What's more, it made our lives better.

For more than 20 years, Boutté has built a career writing and performing his own songs, as well as re-interpreting the signature work of others. This week, Boutté tells Music Inside Out how he got so good at finding lyrics to suit his voice, his tenderness, his outrage and his legendary sass.

UNO Music Department

Jason Patterson returns to the WWNO studio to discuss upcoming plans for this season’s Jazz at the Sandbar.

Most may know Patterson for the managerial work he does at Snug Harbor, but he is also a part of a few non-profit organizations in New Orleans — including lending his talents to the New Orleans Jazz Celebration; a non-profit organization that he says acts as an umbrella organization helping to produce jazz series like A Nickel a Day and Jazz at the Sandbar.

Coming up on Inside the Arts, we hear from rising Cuban star Roberto Fonseca. Yo, his latest CD, is just out on the Concord Jazz label.

The jazz pianist will make a rare concert stop in New Orleans at The House of Blues for a Jazz & Heritage Foundation Jazz Journeys Concert — October 1 at 8 p.m. Admission is free.

Inside the Arts airs Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Thursdays at 7:35 a.m.

Wessell "Warmdaddy" Anderson is one of the top alto saxophonists in jazz today.

A member of Wynton Marsalis's great late-1980s/early-90s septet — and longtime featured artist with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra — Anderson recently sat down with WWNO's Fred Kasten for a "Talkin' Jazz" interview at the Old U.S. Mint.

Gregg Goldman / Music Inside Out

The day we visited Tom McDermott’s home, the sound of James Booker’s “Classified” greeted us. It was a sweet gesture: walking into a man’s home to the sound of your radio show’s theme music.

Bob Travis / Flickr

When the microphone switches on, some people freeze. They can’t think of a thing to say. But Terence Blanchard relaxes. 

Derek Bridges / Flickr

What do you hear when Dr. Michael White plays his clarinet?

Can you hear the bayou? The river? The French Quarter? People sitting on their stoops waiting for someone to deliver the news? Penny parties?

That's not a clarinet in the doctor's hands; it's a time machine.

"I listened to Johnny Dodds' recordings. I listened to Sidney Bechet. I listened to George Lewis. I listened to Edmond Hall. I listened to Omer Simeon, Barney Bigard, and so many others," White says. "And you listen to that and you say, 'Wow, I would like to capture that feeling.'"

August 2, 2013 Jazz New Orleans With Fred Kasten

Aug 8, 2013

Listen now!  

July 19, 2013 Jazz New Orleans with Fred Kasten

Jul 29, 2013

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