Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! will be returning to New Orleans for a show at the Saenger Theatre on March 12.

WWNO General Manager Paul Maassen spoke with WWDTM host Peter Sagal on the history of the show, and why producers just do what they think is funny.

This Thursday’s live show at the Saenger is sold out… but you’ll be able to listen on the air this Saturday, March 14 at 10 a.m., repeating Sunday at 3 p.m.

This week on The Reading Life: Celebrity journalist Kevin Sessums, whose new memoir is I Left It On the Mountain, and LaShonda Katrice Barnett, whose debut novel is Jam on the Vine. She’ll be appearing at this year’s Tennessee Williams/ Literary Festival, as well as the Saints and Sinners Literary Festival.

Zack Smith

They are rooted in the quartet singing tradition and a capella harmonies from the turn of the last century. For more than 40 years, The Zion Harmonizers enjoyed an unparalleled platform at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, anchoring and curating the Gospel Tent.

In the church of New Orleans jazz, they’ve had the keys to the church of church.

Thank goodness. It’s wonderful.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

“Green” used to be just a color. Now it’s a way of life. Everything from household trash to billion-dollar industrial plants can be “green” — meaning we undertake an activity mindful of the impact we’re having on our environment.

We use the word “green” because it’s the most ubiquitous color in nature. In cities we’ve coined a term for urban nature — Green Space.

This week on The Reading Life: Rien Fertel, author of Imagining the Creole City: The Rise of Literary Culture in 19th Century New Orleans, and Linda Seabright of the Creativity Collective, which sponsors a book club called nolalit.

Rien's one of the featured speakers at this year's Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival, and Linda's book group is taking a field trip to the Stanley and Stella Shouting Contest.

We know their public personas, but what do Louisiana’s statewide elected officials do when they’re off the clock?

“Collecting sports memorabilia and Louisiana history stories have been my passions, as of late,” says Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne. He loves to recount those stories he’s learned of the characters and quirks that have made the Bayou State both strange and wonderful. One of his favorite tales involves former state Senator Dudley LeBlanc of Abbeville.

This week on the Reading Life: Director of the University of New Orleans Creative Writing Workshop M.O. Walsh, whose debut novel is My Sunshine Away, and C.S. Harris, author of Who Buries the Dead, the tenth in the Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

WWNO News Director Eve Troeh visited Vietnam on assignment to report on the effects of climate change in a place with water challenges similar to New Orleans. She says it was an adventure unlike any she has recently experienced.

Treewoman8 / Flickr

The excesses of the carnival season are over. So this week, we’re playing sacred music with a foothold in Louisiana. Some songs are religious. Some aren’t. But they’re guaranteed to help get you ready for Easter, or Passover, or whatever day you’ve got circled on the calendar.

Mahalia Jackson, John Boutté, Branford Marsalis, Irma Thomas, Allen Toussaint, and Davell Crawford are in the mix. And so is the brass band that wants to know, “Whatcha gonna do for the rest of your life? Whatcha gonna do to make it right?”

StoryCorps, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to recording, preserving and sharing the stories of Americans from all backgrounds and beliefs, will record interviews in New Orleans from March 12 to April 8 as part of its cross-country MobileBooth tour.