interviews

Deacon John.
Music Inside Out

Deacon John’s mother wanted him to be a singer, but she hated rock ‘n roll.

Oh well. Mrs. Moore’s little boy picked up a guitar, and it wasn’t long before rock ‘n roll came tumbling out.

MusicInsideOut.org

As a child, Jason Marsalis watched old television shows as much for the music as for anything the characters were doing onscreen.

“I became a big fan of reruns of the tv show, The Monkees,” he tells Gwen. “My father thought it was just hilarious that I was into this. But when I look back on it, that was music from the 1960s.”

Bard Early College New Orleans

College education costs a fortune and keeps on getting more expensive. There is, however, one local high school that offers 11th and 12th graders a chance to graduate with a year’s worth of college credit, tuition free.

Thomas Walsh

People’s expectations about “entertainment” aren’t what they used to be. What passed for fun as little as 10 years ago can’t compete with the stimulating, instant gratification of our iWorld.

The owners of the Musee Conti Wax Museum know this too well: earlier this year they sold the building, which will close in January and be replaced by a set of condominiums. Sandra Weil gave tours there for nearly 30 years and shares the back story of the museum.

This week on The Reading Life: Rick Bragg, whose new collection of work is My Southern Journey: True Stories from the Heart of the South. We’ll also hear from Richard Campanella about The Photojournalism of Del Hall 1950s-2000s—New Orleans and Beyond.  And Audrey Niffenegger gives us a spooky seasonal anthology—Ghostly: A Collection of Ghost Stories.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The New Orleans City Council declared October as Notarial Archives Month. New Orleans has one of the richest land records archives in the country.

This week on The Reading Life: Louisiana native Garth Risk Hallberg, author of City On Fire, this season’s biggest debut novel. Chelsea Clinton talks about her new book for young readers who want to make a difference, It’s Your World: Get Informed, Get Inspired and Get Going.

Katy Reckdahl/Juvenile Justice Information Project

At age 17, Henry Montgomery went to jail for killing a deputy in Baton Rouge. He's been in jail ever since, serving a life sentence in Angola penitentiary with no possibility for parole.

On Tuesday the Supreme Court hears a case bearing his name: Montgomery v. Louisiana. Lawyers will make their arguments before the court about mandatory life sentencing for juveniles, specifically who should get a chance at freedom.

Rebirth Brass Band at Underground Arts, 1.11.14
Wendy McCardle / MusicInsideOut.org

This is not John Philip Sousa’s band music.

Don’t get us wrong, Sousa is in the pantheon of them-who-haul-brass-through-the-streets, but we suspect the maestro might be surprised by the music today. Which, if you think about it, is good.

Otherwise, there would only be the old-timey brass band idiom and the genre would have lost touch with the people.

Which is precisely where this music has always lived. With military bands and civic orchestras and parades and funerals and weddings, brass band music has always been popular music.

Ben Burkett

When the Crescent City Farmers Market was founded 20 years ago, farmers in nearby rural areas were hesitant about coming to New Orleans. To them the city was a haven of crime and traffic, but connecting the city to the farm created more opportunities than they imagined.

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