interviews

Rickie Lee Jones.
MusicInsideOut.org

Rickie Lee Jones says she moved to New Orleans, in part, because she wanted to be around people. In Los Angeles, she was mostly around cars.

So far, so good. People from New Orleans — either real or imagined — are all over her latest effort, “The Other Side of Desire.” And one of Jones’ neighbors here even helped inspire a song on the album.

WWNO and producer Eve Abrams have launched Unprisoned: Stories From the System, a project exploring criminal justice and corrections in New Orleans, the most incarcerated place in the world.

Abrams sat down with News Director Eve Troeh to explain how people outside of prisons are being affected as profoundly as the people who are incarcerated.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

As 2015 winds down, we thought we'd take a look back at the year in education. WWNO's Education Reporter Mallory Falk has been covering New Orleans' almost all-charter system, in an ongoing measurement and monitoring of school reform since Hurricane Katrina.

Gregg Goldman / Music Inside Out

Food may be the most popular subject on the planet. In fact, scientists have long said that men and women think about food more often than almost anything else: more often than global warming or world peace, more than super heroes, more often, even, than sex.

We can’t beat those odds, so this week on Music Inside Out we make a grocery list and dedicate the show to Louisiana songs about food.

Musician and author Ben Sandmel joins us for part of the hour. And we’re serving up songs that will hit the spot and keep you happy, until it’s time to think about food again.

Producer Scott Billington, with Irma Thomas and Dr. John.
MusicInsideOut.org

There’s a good chance that the name “Scott Billington” is on the back of your favorite album. Make that “albums.” As a long-time music producer for Rounder Records, Billington has tended the most fertile ground of American music.

John Boutte.
robbiesaurus / Flickr via MusicInsideOut.org

John Boutté is hard to intimidate. He may be the only guy who has ever told Stevie Wonder that his singing was flat. Boutté’s observation, during a chance encounter with Wonder, changed his life for good. What’s more, it made our lives better.

For more than 20 years, Boutté has built a career writing and performing his own songs, as well as re-interpreting the signature work of others. This week, Boutté tells Music Inside Out how he got so good at finding lyrics to suit his voice, his tenderness, his outrage and his legendary sass.

Courtesy

Think back on how you first learned about Thanksgiving. You might have been told the Native Americans and Pilgrims came together in peace and everything was harmonious. Years later, you realized the story is more complicated. But what if you learned the full story from the start?

Joyce N. Boghosian / The White House

Leah Chase: say the name and New Orleanians know exactly who you’re talking about. She’s a great chef, a civil rights activist, and an avid art collector. And it’s not a stretch to say that – to some people – she’s the maternal figure of the city. On this edition of Nola Life Stories, Leah Chase, in her own words.  

This interview was conducted by Mark Cave for the Historic New Orleans Collection.

Deacon John.
Music Inside Out

Deacon John’s mother wanted him to be a singer, but she hated rock ‘n roll.

Oh well. Mrs. Moore’s little boy picked up a guitar, and it wasn’t long before rock ‘n roll came tumbling out.

MusicInsideOut.org

As a child, Jason Marsalis watched old television shows as much for the music as for anything the characters were doing onscreen.

“I became a big fan of reruns of the tv show, The Monkees,” he tells Gwen. “My father thought it was just hilarious that I was into this. But when I look back on it, that was music from the 1960s.”

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