immigration

Anila Keswani
Anila Keswani / Nolavie

New Orleans’ roots are diverse. This summer, Nolavie is speaking with members of different communities that have woven their unique strands into the local culture. Today, Renee Peck speaks with restaurant owner Anila Keswani about her life in the Crescent City and her relationship to its Indian-American community.

From Islands To Delta: A Filipino's Second Homecoming

Jul 7, 2016
Robert Romero
Robert Romero

When Robert Romero first arrived in America from the Philippines over 35 years ago, he was apprehensive about adjusting to an entirely new culture. Since then, Robert has not only adopted New Orleans as his home, he’s now the honorary consul of the Philippines for the state of Louisiana. NolaVie’s Brian Friedman sat down with Robert to hear his story of coming to New Orleans and his perspective on Filipino identity.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Brian Friedman.

Santos Alvarado at a demonstration in front of City Hall last summer.
Fernando Lopez

New Orleans is officially a Welcoming City for immigrants. That’s because last September the City Council passed an ordinance to that effect, as part of a national initiative. But what does that actually mean? Now, four months after the resolution was passed, the City has taken some small but meaningful steps to make New Orleans feel like home for immigrants.

Historic New Orleans Collection

This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. 

Is it cliche to tell a story about Italians that involves wine, extortion and murder? Maybe. Is it about to happen? Definitely.

A nine-day fast is over for 13 protesters pressing the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals to decide a challenge to President Obama’s executive order granting millions some relief from the threat of deportation.

Historic New Orleans Collection, 1974.25.10.52

This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. 

The Historic New Orleans Collection

This is the third episode of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tri (for the city's three centuries) Pod (for podcast), and Tripod, the tool that steadies an image when you capture something. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on the forgotten, neglected, or surprising. It helps us better understand present and future challenges.

This story looks at the arrival of Croatian people, and the split communities between the bayou and the city.

There’s a new report from the Data Center on New Orleans 10 years after Hurricane Katrina.

This one focuses on new Latino immigrants who arrived to work in the area, nearly doubling the number of Latino residents in the region. 

Report co-author Lucas Diaz of Tulane University says the city needs policies to help the new residents feel welcome.

He says those policies should include having bilingual services.

More than half of New Orleans public schools require registration forms that could discourage undocumented students from enrolling. That's according to a new report by the Southern Poverty Law Center and VAYLA New Orleans.

Last June, 13-year-old Yashua Cantillano and his 11-year-old brother, Alinhoel, left their uncle's home in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, with a change of clothes in plastic bags, some snacks, water and their mother's phone number scribbled on a piece of paper.

Their guide and protector? Seventeen-year-old Sulmi Cantillano, their step-sister.

With the help of a smuggler, or coyote, Sulmi says, they got to the Mexican border city of Reynosa about 11 miles south of McAllen, Texas. They crossed the Rio Grande and turned themselves in to the U.S. Border Patrol.

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