hurricane katrina

Work including an amphitheater and improved walking and bike paths is planned at a 200-acre park in eastern New Orleans.

New Orleans CityBusiness reports that recently-opened bids showed Corseault Commercial Inc. of New Orleans as apparent low bidder for work on the west side of Joe Brown Park.

The bid was just over $3 million.

Money is coming from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and a Community Development Block Grant.

The city says FEMA already has contributed $3.3 million toward improvements.

New Trial Ordered for Ex-Cop in Katrina Shooting

Dec 17, 2012

A federal appeals court has ordered a new trial for a former New Orleans police officer who was convicted of manslaughter for fatally shooting a man whose burned body turned up after Hurricane Katrina.

A three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals threw out David Warren's convictions Monday, saying a judge should have separated his trial from other officers charged in the death of 31-year-old Henry Glover.

Following Superstorm Sandy, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has received good grades from politicians and even some survivors of the storm. In part, that's due to lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina seven years ago.

For Staten Island resident Deb Smith, whose house was flooded by the storm surge from Sandy, FEMA has been a savior.

"The New York City subway system is 108 years old, but it has never faced a disaster as devastating as what we experienced last night."

That's how Joseph J. Lhota, the chairman of the Metropolitan Transit Authority, explained the damage caused by Superstorm Sandy to the venerable mass transit system on Tuesday.

The problem is so big that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had deployed an elite 12-member team to help out.

Project Home Again

A nonprofit group that built 101 homes in Gentilly after Hurricane Katrina is launching another drive. Project Home Again will build another 100 energy-efficient houses.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

It’s been more than seven years since Hurricane Katrina left up to five feet of water in his Gentilly house. But Harold Lyons is almost back home.

A federal judge in New Orleans has signed off on a $37.5 million settlement involving companies that provided trailers to thousands left homeless from Gulf Coast hurricanes seven years ago. Some residents claim the trailers contained chemicals that made them sick.

A federal appeals court has reversed itself and thrown out a judge's landmark ruling that the Army Corps of Engineers is liable for billions of dollars in damage that property owners blame on its maintenance of a New Orleans shipping channel.

The same three-judge panel from the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that sided with plaintiffs earlier this year withdrew that decision Monday and ruled in the federal government's favor.

The panel's new opinion says the corps is completely insulated from liability by a provision of the Federal Tort Claims Act.

Tyler A. Gamble / New Orleans Mayor's Office

A New Orleans community center destroyed by Hurricane Katrina is getting a $5 million renovation. The new facility is set to be completed by this spring.

Engineer: Excavation caused Katrina collapse

Sep 18, 2012

An engineering expert has testified he believes excavation work performed by an Army Corps of Engineers contractor caused New Orleans' floodwalls to breach in two places during Hurricane Katrina.

Robert Bea, a retired University of California engineering professor, explained his position Monday during a trial of homeowners' claims against the corps and contractor Washington Group International Inc.

Bea is an expert witness for the plaintiffs.

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