Hurricane Katrina

Find stories from WWNO, NPR and our partner stations as we explore New Orleans and the Gulf South 10 years after Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.

The images continue to haunt: storm surge from Hurricane Katrina pouring through gaps in failed flood walls, rapidly rising waters, desperate New Orleanians trapped on rooftops.

Terri Coleman, Gentilly resident and teacher at Dillard University
Rush Jagoe

You might have noticed a few cameras around town this week. Yes, the entire media world has descended on New Orleans.

 

But some reporters began digging around the city much earlier in the summer, in hopes of providing more in depth coverage. Anna Sale is the host of a year-old podcast from WNYC, the public radio station in New York City, called Death Sex & Money. Each episode focuses on one person, and gives them the chance to explore and dissect moments from their lives.

This week is filled with events marking the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Among them: a conference on the current state of Black New Orleans.

The three-day conference — hosted by the Urban League — kicked off with a town hall and panels focused on education.

Photographs of New Orleans Lower Ninth Ward line a wall in a local art gallery.  It’s the images Danita Bright captured of Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath.  

 

Surreal and devastating, one particular picture draws my attention.

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans today is smaller than when the storm hit, with 110,000 fewer people than the nearly half-million who had lived there. But the city's recovery is a story that varies with each neighborhood. In some neighborhoods, like the Lower Ninth Ward, many residents never returned. Others, like the French Quarter, have seen many newcomers and now have more households than they did in 2005.

After Hurricane Katrina, A Traffic Deluge

Aug 26, 2015

Right after Hurricane Katrina, tens of thousands of people rushed from New Orleans and elsewhere along the Gulf Coast to Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

The influx of evacuees and recovery crews was a recipe for road congestion. Traffic volumes hit 25-year projected growth overnight. There was gridlock in Louisiana’s capital city.

The head of the federal agency for volunteering and service says Hurricane Katrina created new ways of thinking about disaster response for volunteer organizations.

St. Bernard Fire Department via The Historic New Orleans Collection

This month, as part of WWNO's ongoing Katrina 10 coverage, we bring you The Katrina Files: Reflections from First Responders. This series is based on oral histories conducted by The Historic New Orleans Collection and hosted by Paul Maassen.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Ten years after Katrina, the Army Corps of Engineers says it is ready for the next big one. The Corps has built new levees, floodwalls and gated structures over the past decade to protect the city and its people.

As we mark the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast and killed more than 1,800 people in August of 2005, Here & Now listens back to some of the memorable moments from the storm and the news coverage.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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