Hurricane Katrina

Find stories from WWNO, NPR and our partner stations as we explore New Orleans and the Gulf South 10 years after Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.

A federal judge has rescheduled the retrials of two former New Orleans police officers charged in the fatal shooting of a man whose body was burned in a car in Hurricane Katrina's aftermath.

A retrial is scheduled to start Aug. 26 for David Warren, who shot and killed 31-year-old Henry Glover outside a strip mall less than a week after the 2005 storm.

A retrial for Travis McCabe, who is charged with writing a false report on Glover's shooting, is set to start Sept. 23.

New Orleans has celebrated plenty of milestones on its slow road to recovery from Hurricane Katrina, but arguably none is bigger than hosting its first Super Bowl since the 2005 storm left the city in shambles.

To see the remnants of Katrina's destruction, fans coming arriving for Sunday's game will have to stray from the French Quarter and the downtown corridor where the Superdome is located. Even in neighborhoods that bore the brunt of the storm, many of the most glaring scars have faded over time.

Seven years after Hurricane Katrina, five years after the onset of the Great Recession, and nearly three years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, what does the very latest data say about how the city and region are doing?

New Orleans is a smaller city but is still growing.

A former New Orleans police officer has asked a federal judge to disqualify himself from presiding over his retrial on charges he fatally shot a man without justification in Hurricane Katrina's aftermath before the man's body was burned in a car.

A court filing Monday by lawyers for the former officer, David Warren, says U.S. District Judge Lance Africk made comments on the case that could call his impartiality into question.

There's a quick, one-word explanation for why the federal government started selling flood insurance: Betsy.

Hurricane Betsy, which struck the Gulf Coast in 1965, became known as billion-dollar Betsy. Homes were ruined. Water up to the roofs. People paddling around streets in boats. Massive damage.

This would be the time when you'd expect people to be pulling out their flood insurance policies. But flood insurance was hard to come by. You could get fire insurance, theft insurance, car insurance, life insurance. Not flood.

Kenner streets damaged during Hurricane Katrina will be repaired in a $26.7 million project set to start in spring.

The Times-Picayune reports that the work is federally financed. The damage was caused by flooding and also by heavy equipment deployed to collect debris after the August 2005 storm.

Among thoroughfares in the repair plan are Joe Yenni and Chateau boulevards, Vintage and Loyola drives, West Esplanade Avenue, Williams Boulevard, West Metairie Avenue and Roosevelt Drive.

A newly-elected New Orleans city councilman, whose district includes the Lower 9th Ward, has withdrawn a package of ordinances that would have required tour buses to pay special fees to access the neighborhood.

Councilman James Gray, who took office last month, says he needs more time to research the issue introduced by his predecessor.

Currently, the city has an ordinance in place that bans tour buses from the Lower 9th Ward. It was passed after Hurricane Katrina to keep tour buses from impeding cleanup and recovery efforts when levees failed during the 2005 storm.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu's office is touting its latest court victory in its efforts to improve blighted property in a neighborhood hard hit by flooding after Hurricane Katrina.

The mayor's office said Tuesday that a judge has upheld a city code enforcement action against the Lake Terrace Shopping Center in the Gentilly neighborhood. The shopping center has been empty since the 2005 storm.

Work including an amphitheater and improved walking and bike paths is planned at a 200-acre park in eastern New Orleans.

New Orleans CityBusiness reports that recently-opened bids showed Corseault Commercial Inc. of New Orleans as apparent low bidder for work on the west side of Joe Brown Park.

The bid was just over $3 million.

Money is coming from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and a Community Development Block Grant.

The city says FEMA already has contributed $3.3 million toward improvements.

New Trial Ordered for Ex-Cop in Katrina Shooting

Dec 17, 2012

A federal appeals court has ordered a new trial for a former New Orleans police officer who was convicted of manslaughter for fatally shooting a man whose burned body turned up after Hurricane Katrina.

A three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals threw out David Warren's convictions Monday, saying a judge should have separated his trial from other officers charged in the death of 31-year-old Henry Glover.