Hurricane Katrina

Find stories from WWNO, NPR and our partner stations as we explore New Orleans and the Gulf South 10 years after Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.

Former governor Kathleen Blanco is interviewed by historian Mark Cave.
Michael Wynne

Kathleen Blanco is the only woman to be elected governor of Louisiana, and was at the helm when Hurricane Katrina laid waste to the Gulf Coast. She admits that the challenges of the storm were too much for state and local governments to handle.

Jesse Hardman

According to a study by the Data Center, the Hispanic population of the New Orleans metro area has nearly doubled since the year 2000. Many people immigrated from Mexico and Central America, or migrated from other parts of the U.S. to work in cleanup and construction after Katrina. The Latino population of greater New Orleans continues to grow and reshape the culture of the city.

Kate Richardson

Nearly a quarter of a million people evacuated to Houston from New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, and in 2006 there were still about 150,000 Katrina evacuees in the Bayou City. As of 2012, 40,000 had resettled permanently from New Orleans to the Houston area.

There’s a new report from the Data Center on New Orleans 10 years after Hurricane Katrina.

This one focuses on new Latino immigrants who arrived to work in the area, nearly doubling the number of Latino residents in the region. 

Report co-author Lucas Diaz of Tulane University says the city needs policies to help the new residents feel welcome.

He says those policies should include having bilingual services.

Housing advocates rally outside the federal building in New Orleans.
Eileen Fleming / WWNO

Housing activists are pressing the federal Housing and Urban Development department to help New Orleans residents return to homes that were damaged after Hurricane Katrina. They staged a protest at the federal building before dropping off a letter outlining their case.

Jason Saul

You don't realize how much you appreciate traffic lights until you have to drive around a city without any. This week on Katrina: The Debris, getting around New Orleans, during and after the storm.

Kate Richardson / WWNO

New Orleans is a family city. Grandparents and grandkids, cousins, aunts and uncles often live in the same house, share the same traditions. When Katrina hit, many families evacuated together — three generations crammed into one car.

Photo of Gustave Blache III work / Flawlessentrprs

The root of the word “restaurant” is in fact the French verb restaurer​, to restore. And New Orleans restaurateurs, the proprietors, were seen as key figures in restoring the life and spirit of the city. But in those first months after the flood, nobody was sure how or even if the city's most famous restaurants were going to reopen. 

Bring New Orleans Back Commission / Urban Land Institute

The first comprehensive map for rebuilding New Orleans came out in early 2006, about six months after the flood. Saying it was highly anticipated would be an understatement. On it, some symbols that appeared as a death knell for some neighborhoods: green dots.

National Weather Service

Incredible by Modern Standards— June 1

New Orleans is a weather town. As hurricane season begins, hear the most emotional federal weather bulletin ever written. Plus, more on how the National Weather Service is using social science to improve forecasts. And hear from New Orleans residents who say the argument to call our 2005 disaster “The Federal Flood” instead of just “Katrina” still holds water. Why that weather wording matters.

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