home elevation

Travis Lux / WWNO

The state has a coastal master plan to stave off land loss and each parish has it’s own plans for the coast.

 

In Terrebonne Parish, officials are looking for public buy-in. Earlier this week they invited people to the Houma-Terrebonne Civic Center for Coastal Day -- a science fair of sorts displaying all the coastal projects in their backyard.

 

St. Tammany Parish is hosting two meetings this week to help flooded homeowners with paperwork for home elevation funds granted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The first meeting is 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon in Mandeville, at the St. Tammany Parish Council Chambers, 21490 Koop Drive.

 

The second meeting is 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday afternoon in Slidell, on the fifth floor of the Towers Administration Building, 520 Old Spanish Trail.

 

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Making a home in Southeastern Louisiana has always meant risk of flooding. While some families in low lying coastal parishes elevated their homes in the 1990s, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita kicked off a boom of raising homes.

Now, more than 150 elevation companies operate in Orleans Parish alone, and have spent the past decade competing for billions of dollars in federal subsidies to help local homeowners elevate.   

Home elevation has been a big topic — and a big headache — since the post-Katrina floods of 2005. It’s often an expensive process, but our partners at The Lens found a home elevation grant program that seems to have a particularly big price tag: $11.8 million dollars to raise 48 to 55 homes. That’s about a quarter million per house, on average.

Reporter Charles Maldonado at The Lens looked deeper into this budget item. He talked to WWNO News Director Eve Troeh about the situation.