HNOC Oral History Initiative

Historic New Orleans Collection

Call them whatever you want: hipsters or hippies, beatniks or punks, New Orleans has always been an attractive place for American bohemianism. But despite its laid back attitude, the people down here often think these subcultures threaten the way things are done. Amzie Adams encountered that kind of opposition when he moved here in the late 60’s, but then quickly found a way to participate in New Orleans’ culture. 

John Menzser

The latest edition of NOLA Life Stories takes place at a department store in Gretna, 1937. This is a time when families lived above the store, when advertisements were delivered door to door, and babies got their first pair of shoes for free.

This was also a time of separate but equal, of back-of-the-bus politics. But not every nook and cranny of the city was gripped by segregation. As Sam and John Menszer remember, the customers at their family’s shop kept any racist attitudes– and their bags – at the door.  

Historic New Orleans City

It’s estimated that local non-profits have annual expenditures of over $550 million and must rely on government subsidies, fundraising campaigns and grant proposals to complete their missions. Philanthropic groups, like the Joe W. and Dorothy Dorsett Brown Foundation, develop their own mission statements to support those institutions and spend the year deciding where to allocate funds.

Historic New Orleans Collection

When Sal Impastato handed over the keys of the Napoleon House this past spring, it was an emotional moment.

Selling the business to restauranteur Ralph Brennan had been a difficult decision because the building had been in Sal’s family for generations – first as a grocery, then as a bar.

After being hired in the spring of 1975, Angela Hill was quickly promoted to co-anchor of the news at local television station WWL.
WWL-TV

For over 38 years, Angela Hill served as anchor for the most popular news channel in New Orleans, WWL-TV. She got her start, however, in smaller market stations in Texas in the early 1970's. At that time, having the news delivered by a solitary male anchor was still the industry model, but that was about to change.

George Wein, seated, worked with different music experts to guarantee that the Jazz Fest lineup was stylistically diverse.
Newport Festivals Foundation, Inc.

Jazz Fest creator George Wein was a pianist and professor of jazz studies at Boston University when he organized the Newport Jazz Festival in 1954. He scored another hit with the Newport Folk Festival and became a sought after concert promoter.

When officials from New Orleans wanted him to produce a festival in the Crescent City, George knew he wanted to do it, but encountered some obstacles along the way.

Creative Commons/Louisiana Council for the Vieux Carré

The Historic New Orleans Collection and its senior curator Mark Cave have collected oral histories of some of this city's extraordinary citizens. On this week's Notes from New Orleans, Sharon Litwin links HNOC's remarkable recording of soon-to-be 92 year-old former Lt. Governor Jimmy Fitzmorris to the anniversary of a controversial event; one that is likely not familiar to many younger Orleanians and certainly not to most newcomers.