The Town of Jean Lafitte is unveiling an official state historical marker Saturday.

Local officials are proud of the community named after the smuggler who became a military hero in the war of 1812.

Say what you will about Jean Lafitte — smuggler, pirate, scoundrel — but his name still draws a crowd. There’s the bar in the French Quarter, and the Jefferson Parish town with his name.

Retired columnist Angus Lind's news beat was decidedly upbeat compared to the grave stories he followed as a young man in the 1970's.
The Historic New Orleans Collection

Angus Lind’s column in The Times-Picayune documented things that he described as, “a little offbeat”:  people, places and events that gave New Orleans its local color. But that didn’t come until later in his career. When he got started in the early 1970s as a young man, Angus was a general-assignment reporter who cut his teeth on a series of tragic events within a single calendar year.

kniemla / Flickr

Louisiana gained its first World Heritage Site on Sunday. The ancient earthworks of Poverty Point, LA were designated by UNESCO as the 22nd world heritage site in the U.S.,  alongside landmarks like the Grand Canyon and the Statue of Liberty.

It was one of seven sites around the world to be given the designation by the United Nations at a meeting in Qatar. The others are in Botswana, France, Israel, Italy and two locations in Turkey.

Louisiana State Museum

Each month Richard Campanella explores an aspect of New Orleans’ geography. His Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune shines a light on structural, often-overlooked or invisible aspects of the city. This month: a flood in 1849. Up until Katrina it was the largest deluge in the city’s history.

Campanella says that disaster 165 years ago had something in common with Katrina.

During the 1984 World's Fair, Jeanne Nathan was not only beset on all sides by publicity issues, but she was also pregnant, which naturally added to her stress.
Historic New Orleans Collection


As the Director of Public Relations for the 1984 World's Fair, Jeanne Nathan had her work cut out for her.

The fair not only had to compete with the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, but it was challenged by an oil crash, political conflict, and bad publicity. It remains the only World’s Fair to declare bankruptcy during its run. Despite that, Jeanne feels New Orleans learned invaluable lessons in tourism and marketing that are still used today, but will be the first to admit that handling the Fair’s image was a constant uphill battle. 

Before his career in politics, deLesseps "Chep" Morrison earned the rank of major general in the Army Reserve during World War II.
Historic New Orleans Collection

deLesseps “Chep” Morrison was the mayor of New Orleans from 1946 to 1961. History will remember his administration as a polarizing one: he lured corporations to town, but also upheld segregationist values. He ran for Louisiana governor three times, and lost his final election in the winter of 1964. Months later, he spoke with future Lieutenant Governor Jimmy Fitzmorris, who still remembers their final conversation.

Courtesy Richard Campanella

This month's Cityscapes column in NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune from geographer and author Richard Campanella details the geography of the Greek community in New Orleans. Most city residents would probably first think of Greek Fest, the annual festival held on the grounds of Holy Trinity Eastern Orthodox Church overlooking Bayou St. John. The congregation marks its 150th anniversary this year.

The regional archeologist for northwest Louisiana, based at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, is out with a book this month that examines the dynamic cultural landscape of the Caddo people and their complex connections with the greater Native American community in the Southeastern U.S.

Jeffrey Girard is the co-author of “Caddo Connections: Cultural Interactions Within and Beyond the Caddo World.” Girard says the book traces the Caddo Indians over 1,000 years and compiles a decade of the latest research.

Courtesy Library of Congress

Each month geographer Richard Campanella shares a few insights from his Cityscapes column, found at Nola.com and the Times-Picayune. Today he describes a building that once defined the New Orleans skyline. It was a shot tower — a factory to produce ammunition.

We sat down to talk with Professor Campanella about the structure.

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

March is Women's History Month in the United States and the United Kingdom. To honor the month-long event, this week on Louisiana Eats! we'll speak with some of our favorite ladies in the Louisiana food scene.

Julia Reed joins us for a reflection on her life in the Mississippi Delta and why New Orleans is so dear to her heart. We'll also speak with the co-founder of the Red Stick Market in Baton Rouge and hear how Linda Green helped unit a Korean soup with a New Orleans cultural celebration.