History

Count Bernard Saint Bris and host Poppy Tooker in the gardens of his family's château, Clos Lucé.
Courtesy of Poppy Tooker

Recently, Louisiana Eats! host Poppy Tooker packed up her recording equipment, bid a cheery adieu to her company of sound engineers and went rogue to make Louisiana Eats! radio in France. On this week's episode, we share Poppy's incredible experience abroad.

Marie Saint Bris sets the table for "le dîner bleu" in the dining room of her family's Château Beauchêne in France's Loire River Valley.
Poppy Tooker

Knowing the human history behind any dish just makes it taste better. On this week's episode of Louisiana Eats!, we hit the books with several food historians to hear tales of our culinary past.

First, we speak with Dr. David Shields of the University of South Carolina, who shares his years of research on American culinarians. His upcoming book, "Culinarians: American Chefs, Caterers & Restaurateurs," is the first ever biographical collection of culinary movers and shakers in America.

Richard Campanella

Each month we talk with Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com/The Times-Picayune. This month the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture reflects on the idea of natural disasters and their historic impact on New Orleans.

While Katrina’s 10th Anniversary is taking center stage right now, WWNOs Jesse Hardman sat down with Campanella to talk about another famous hurricane, in 1722, that allowed French city planners to completely redesign the city.

StoryCorps

When Gwen Smith’s co-worker didn’t arrive for work before Hurricane Katrina made landfall in 2005, Smith was forced to stay on the clock. By the time she left, it was too late to leave town and she was forced to ride out the storm with her sister, Crystal. The two women were in town for nearly a week and remember those days vividly.

The National WWII Museum

Inspired by the stories of World War II veterans, the late University of New Orleans historian Stephen Ambrose wanted to build a museum that would honor their experience.

courtesy of the Holden Family Collection

Most Americans hear the phrase “slave trade” and picture ships sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, with captured Africans chained inside, terrorized and sick. But twice as many people were sold in the domestic slave trade, which forcibly moved over a million people, primarily from the Upper South to the Lower South, primarily over land and on foot.

After the United States outlawed international slave trading in 1808, New Orleans became home to the nation’s largest domestic slave market.

A Minden, La., historian has a new book of vintage photographs of his hometown. John A. Agan accumulated photos of Minden’s heritage over several decades. The book is titled “Lost Minden” because the town sustained a number of devastating fires, according to Agan. At the turn of the 20th century, a city ordinance banned wooden structures in its downtown. Agan says his book captures the businesses, town celebrations, storefronts and back streets that otherwise only remain in memories.

New Orleans is known for its enormous Vietnamese population, one of the largest in the country. But we recently came across a story about a now-lost Chinatown in New Orleans — two of them, in fact — and how they came to be. To understand how these hubs came about, and why they disappeared, we have to rewind the clock 150 years, to the end of the Civil War.

A gray-haired man stands inside the entrance to the U.S. Freedom Pavilion of the National World War II Museum, located on the corner of Magazine Street and Andrews Higgins Boulevard, in the Warehouse District of New Orleans.

The man at the museum is clearly a veteran, judging from the ballcap he wears identifying his military outfit. He is a volunteer here, and I thank him for his service, as I wait for my wife and daughter to join me.

Centenary College's Meadows Museum of Art features a photography retrospective, “Images of Excellence: The O. Winston Link Centennial,” running through Jan. 31. The photographer's son, Shreveport resident W. Conway Link, helped curate the exhibit. It features more than 50 black and white photographs, including three large bodies of Link's work—his Louisiana series, his commercial photography, and his steam locomotive series. Commentator Gary Joiner explains who was O. Winston Link.

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