History

courtesy of the Holden Family Collection

Most Americans hear the phrase “slave trade” and picture ships sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, with captured Africans chained inside, terrorized and sick. But twice as many people were sold in the domestic slave trade, which forcibly moved over a million people, primarily from the Upper South to the Lower South, primarily over land and on foot.

After the United States outlawed international slave trading in 1808, New Orleans became home to the nation’s largest domestic slave market.

A Minden, La., historian has a new book of vintage photographs of his hometown. John A. Agan accumulated photos of Minden’s heritage over several decades. The book is titled “Lost Minden” because the town sustained a number of devastating fires, according to Agan. At the turn of the 20th century, a city ordinance banned wooden structures in its downtown. Agan says his book captures the businesses, town celebrations, storefronts and back streets that otherwise only remain in memories.

New Orleans is known for its enormous Vietnamese population, one of the largest in the country. But we recently came across a story about a now-lost Chinatown in New Orleans — two of them, in fact — and how they came to be. To understand how these hubs came about, and why they disappeared, we have to rewind the clock 150 years, to the end of the Civil War.

A gray-haired man stands inside the entrance to the U.S. Freedom Pavilion of the National World War II Museum, located on the corner of Magazine Street and Andrews Higgins Boulevard, in the Warehouse District of New Orleans.

The man at the museum is clearly a veteran, judging from the ballcap he wears identifying his military outfit. He is a volunteer here, and I thank him for his service, as I wait for my wife and daughter to join me.

Centenary College's Meadows Museum of Art features a photography retrospective, “Images of Excellence: The O. Winston Link Centennial,” running through Jan. 31. The photographer's son, Shreveport resident W. Conway Link, helped curate the exhibit. It features more than 50 black and white photographs, including three large bodies of Link's work—his Louisiana series, his commercial photography, and his steam locomotive series. Commentator Gary Joiner explains who was O. Winston Link.

National World War II Museum

Thomas Blakey, the 94-year-old veteran who volunteered at the National World War II Museum for 15 years, passed away at his New Orleans home on Jan. 15.

The National World War II Museum in New Orleans is many things to many people. For the hundreds of school kids and other visitors who pass through, the museum is where they learn about an incomprehensible scene from world history. And for the World War II veterans who volunteer each day, the museum is where they confront war memories in a variety of different ways.

Lieutenant Governor Jay Dardenne says a movie is in the works about the Battle of New Orleans.

Atchity Brothers Entertainment will produce the feature film, "Andrew Jackson — Battle of New Orleans."  It’s based on military historian Ron Drez's latest book, "The War of 1812: Conflict And Deception."

The Advocate reports the project is endorsed by the Battle of New Orleans Bicentennial Commission.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

The French Consul General of New Orleans took part in a ceremony Thursday marking the 200th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans. The bravery being remembered from the War of 1812 was brought forward into the present-day war on terrorism.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

Thursday marked the 200th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans, which influenced the course of American history and propelled Andrew Jackson to the Presidency.

The Historic New Orleans Collection currently has an exhibition on view entitled Andrew Jackson: Hero of New Orleans. WWNO’s Paul Maassen talked to HNOC’s Associate Director for the Williams Research Center, Jason Wiese, about the exhibit, Jackson, and the Battle's anniversary.

The sesquecentennial of the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1965, with the remnants of Fazendeville visible in the background.
National Park Service

When Eldgridge Cager was growing up in Fazendeville in the 1950s, he and his friends would look for cannonballs, broken muskets and swords on the other side of the Mississippi River levee — just a few blocks from his house in the all-black community. They’d bring the rusty treasures to “Old Man” Linch, the Park Superintendent of the Chalmette Monument, a tall white obelisk towering over the cow pasture across from Fazendeville.

The youngsters called the monument “the Castle,” and in exchange for cannonballs the size of bowling balls, Linch let them run up the circular stairs, round and round to the very top. “We used to have races to see who gets up there the fastest,” recalls Cager. “I’m in my 60s now. I’ve tried to walk up there. Oh, boy.”

Pages