History

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Sixty eight years ago this week — May 8, 1945 to be exact — the Second World War ended in Europe with the signing of the official documents in Berlin. But, for one group of British military women, it would be more than 30 years before they were allowed to talk about their secret role in that devastating conflict.

Sharon Litwin had the chance to speak with one of them for this week's Notes from New Orleans; she filed this report from the back patio of a charming, soft-spoken resident of Covington, Louisiana.

Commentator Gary Joiner remembers the day that the surrender of Germany was announced. May 8, 1945, officially ending the European phase of World War II.


Copyright 2013 KDAQ-FM. To see more, visit http://www.redriverradio.org/.

A major collection of Civil War documents is now part of the permanent collection entrusted to Tulane University. The papers include those written by Confederate President Jefferson Davis as well as the diaries of soldiers.


Wally Gobetz / Flickr

The French Quarter is alive with music this weekend as the 30th annual French Quarter Festival kicks into high gear.

Music has been central to the identity of New Orleans from the earliest years of the city's founding, and a casual stroll through the streets of the French Quarter will bring you past centuries of tangible music history.

While you're down in the Quarter for the Festival, or any time at all, make sure you don't miss these landmarks.

J&M Recording Studio
840 North Rampart St. (corner of Dumaine)

History Matters commentator Gary Joiner explores the historical significance of the dogtrot home, and why this type of architecture deserves to have a future.

Copyright 2013 KDAQ-FM. To see more, visit http://www.redriverradio.org/.

Courtesy The National WWII Museum

For many, the stakes and the scale of World War II are hard to fathom. It was a war fought around the world, against powerful, determined regimes in Europe and the Pacific; some 65 million people died. And as the number of people who have actual memories of the war dwindle — as of next year, there will be fewer than 1 million living veterans — the mission of the National World War II Museum in New Orleans becomes all the more urgent.

A program focused on the 198th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans is planned Jan. 10 at 6 p.m. at the Old U.S. Mint in the French Quarter.

Tulane University graduate student Shelene Roumillat will focus on how during the 19th century the anniversary of the battle was a major holiday in New Orleans.

In the battle, fought Jan. 8, 1815 — weeks after a peace treaty ended the War of 1812 — a force of American troops, pirates and local residents routed a British Army at a plantation in St. Bernard Parish.

Northwestern State University has added new information on the university's history to its Traditions website.

The Times reports the Traditions site was set up earlier this year to recognize Northwestern State's heritage.

The new page — at traditions.nsula.edu/collections/our-heritage — has information on the legend of Isabella, the campus ghost; the Alma Mater; the Demon Fight Song; Vic the Demon and more.

These days, what we find in the mailbox tends to fall into one of two categories: junk mail or quaint hand-written reminders of times past.

While the mail may now vacillate between irritating or antiquated, for more than two hundred years the U.S. Post Office played a central role in American life. It was not only the institution that allowed us to communicate with each other across state lines and beyond, but it played a vital part in our country’s political organization and hierarchies.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Fifty years ago this week, communications went global. July 12, 1962 the Telstar 1 satellite from AT&T became the first commercial spacecraft to beam television images from the United States to Europe.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

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