History

Last week’s TriPod saw an example of solidarity in opposition to slavery among people of African descent. But the dynamics within enslaved communities were complicated, and it was far from one big brotherhood. Allegiances were not automatic, and the story of a runaway named Francisque, who found his way to New Orleans in 1766, shows just that.

This week on the Reading Life:  Loyola University historian Eberhard "Lo" Faber, author of Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America.  And military historian Antony Beevor, author of Ardennes 1944: The Battle of the Bulge, who's coming to town for the National World War II Museum's International Conference on World War II: 1945: The Bitter End.

The Mechanical Curator Collection / The British Library

This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. 

Marion Post Wolcott / Library of Congress

The historic Dew Drop Inn in Central City is in the midst of a revival. For many years it was the hot spot in the Jim Crow South where guests could catch a show, grab a sandwich, spend a night, and even get a haircut.

The Historic New Orleans Collection, 1974.25.23.4

This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. This story visits physical landmarks that bear witness to the city’s role in the national slave trade.

Historic New Orleans Collection

This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. 

Is it cliche to tell a story about Italians that involves wine, extortion and murder? Maybe. Is it about to happen? Definitely.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The New Orleans City Council declared October as Notarial Archives Month. New Orleans has one of the richest land records archives in the country.

Historic New Orleans Collection, 1974.25.10.52

This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. 

Traditional German food at the Deutsches Haus Oktoberfest in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

There’s nothing strictly seasonal about weinerschnitzel or bratwurst. But dine around New Orleans during October and you might think we were witnessing just a brief window of availability to enjoy these traditional German dishes.

The reason isn’t the season, of course, but the theme, and that’s Oktoberfest, which is not any one event anymore but an entire month of eager encouragement to guzzle beer by the stein and tamp it all down under a mat of sauerkraut and sausage.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

This is the third episode of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tri (for the city's three centuries) Pod (for podcast), and Tripod, the tool that steadies an image when you capture something. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on the forgotten, neglected, or surprising. It helps us better understand present and future challenges.

This story looks at the arrival of Croatian people, and the split communities between the bayou and the city.

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