History

Features
7:51 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Cityscapes: Richard Campanella On New Orleans' Sauvé's Crevasse Flood Of 1849

New Orleans was inundated by Mississippi River waters in the spring of 1849. This oil painting by Elizabeth Lamoisse shows Canal Street at the time of the flood. "Landscape" by Elizabeth Lamoisse, 1848 - 1849, from the Louisiana State Museum.
Louisiana State Museum

Each month Richard Campanella explores an aspect of New Orleans’ geography. His Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune shines a light on structural, often-overlooked or invisible aspects of the city. This month: a flood in 1849. Up until Katrina it was the largest deluge in the city’s history.

Campanella says that disaster 165 years ago had something in common with Katrina.

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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Tue May 27, 2014

The Bright Side Of An Economic Disaster: Jeanne Nathan Reflects On The 1984 World's Fair

During the 1984 World's Fair, Jeanne Nathan was not only beset on all sides by publicity issues, but she was also pregnant, which naturally added to her stress.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

As the Director of Public Relations for the 1984 World's Fair, Jeanne Nathan had her work cut out for her.

The fair not only had to compete with the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, but it was challenged by an oil crash, political conflict, and bad publicity. It remains the only World’s Fair to declare bankruptcy during its run. Despite that, Jeanne feels New Orleans learned invaluable lessons in tourism and marketing that are still used today, but will be the first to admit that handling the Fair’s image was a constant uphill battle. 

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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Wed May 21, 2014

50 Years Later: The Startling Death Of Former Mayor Chep Morrison

Before his career in politics, deLesseps "Chep" Morrison earned the rank of major general in the Army Reserve during World War II.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

deLesseps “Chep” Morrison was the mayor of New Orleans from 1946 to 1961. History will remember his administration as a polarizing one: he lured corporations to town, but also upheld segregationist values. He ran for Louisiana governor three times, and lost his final election in the winter of 1964. Months later, he spoke with future Lieutenant Governor Jimmy Fitzmorris, who still remembers their final conversation.    


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Community
5:57 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: How New Orleans Got Greek

The first permanent structure of the Holy Trinity Eastern Orthodox Church was built 1866.
Courtesy Richard Campanella

This month's Cityscapes column in NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune from geographer and author Richard Campanella details the geography of the Greek community in New Orleans. Most city residents would probably first think of Greek Fest, the annual festival held on the grounds of Holy Trinity Eastern Orthodox Church overlooking Bayou St. John. The congregation marks its 150th anniversary this year.

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Red River Radio
9:15 am
Tue April 29, 2014

'Caddo Connections' sets up research-driven view of Caddo culture

The regional archeologist for northwest Louisiana, based at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, is out with a book this month that examines the dynamic cultural landscape of the Caddo people and their complex connections with the greater Native American community in the Southeastern U.S.

Jeffrey Girard is the co-author of “Caddo Connections: Cultural Interactions Within and Beyond the Caddo World.” Girard says the book traces the Caddo Indians over 1,000 years and compiles a decade of the latest research.

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Community
4:02 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: New Orleans' Tallest, Strangest, Forgotten Building

Old Shot Tower 1885
Courtesy Library of Congress

Each month geographer Richard Campanella shares a few insights from his Cityscapes column, found at Nola.com and the Times-Picayune. Today he describes a building that once defined the New Orleans skyline. It was a shot tower — a factory to produce ammunition.

We sat down to talk with Professor Campanella about the structure.

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Louisiana Eats!
5:00 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Come Celebrate Women's History Month With Innovators In Food

Women gather together in the name of food in 1917. The first International Women's Day occurred in 1911 and has become a month-long historical appreciation.
Credit U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

March is Women's History Month in the United States and the United Kingdom. To honor the month-long event, this week on Louisiana Eats! we'll speak with some of our favorite ladies in the Louisiana food scene.

Julia Reed joins us for a reflection on her life in the Mississippi Delta and why New Orleans is so dear to her heart. We'll also speak with the co-founder of the Red Stick Market in Baton Rouge and hear how Linda Green helped unit a Korean soup with a New Orleans cultural celebration.

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Features
8:57 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: How New Orleans House Numbers Came To Be

MItchell 1864 Map of New Orleans
wikimedia commons

Today we start a new series with New Orleans geographer Richard Campanella. The Tulane professor and author of Bienville’s Dilemma and Geographies of New Orleans, among other titles, also recently started a column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune. His “Cityscapes” pieces explore New Orleans’ urban landscape and history each month.

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Arts & Culture
9:55 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Remembering JFK 50 Years After Dallas

Graffiti on the fence along the grassy knoll adjacent to JFK's motorcade route.
Eileen Fleming WWNO

As 2013 comes to a close, we’re looking back at some memorable moments. Eileen Fleming shares a visit she made to Dallas for a milestone historic memorial.

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History
9:58 am
Fri December 20, 2013

A Proclamation To The Citizens Of New Orleans (1803)

Proclamation to the People of New Orleans, 12/20/1803.
Credit U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

210 years ago today, Governor William C.C. Claiborne issued this document to the people of New Orleans, announcing the United States' purchase of the Louisiana Territory two months earlier.

The proclamation — in three languages — explains the transition from Spain to France to the United States, and clarifies for the people of the city their new rights, and their responsibilities, as newly-minted Americans.

(h/t @wrightbryan3)

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