Cityscapes: New Orleans Almost Had A Monorail

Feb 4, 2016
Tulane Special Collections

New Orleans has various ways of transportation to get around the city including ferries, streetcars and buses.  However, in 1958 New Orleans planned to create a new form of getting around: a monorail. The idea of creating the monorail came from the city's urge to remain modern and keep up with Houston, which had recently passed New Orleans as the largest city in the region. 

 1918 photo of Louis Mayer's father (Louis E. Mayer), and uncles Gus (Gustave John Mayer) and Rudolph Mayer on the stage at the Turnverein von New Orleans. Uncle Gus is top left, Louis Mayer is in the middle.
Louis Mayer

When you think about gymnastics — parallel bars, the pommel horse, ropes — what else pops into your head? Fighting Napoleon and frosted beer mugs? Me too!

Here's how the Germans brought gymnastics to New Orleans.

Continuum this week presents a program called The Cries of London, referring to the short lyrical and musical calls of merchants hawking their products and services at the beginning of the 17th century. Many street cries were incorporated into larger musical works, preserving them from oblivion.

Cityscapes: When Bourbon Street Was Elite

Jan 7, 2016
Getty Images

Each month Richard Campanella talks to WWNO about his Cityscapes column for NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune. This month: Bourbon Street.

Leon Trice, photographer / Historic New Orleans Collection

On January 1, 1935 Americans were dealing with some big issues: the Great Depression had crippled the economy and the Dust Bowl had scoured the land. But down in New Orleans the mood was celebratory: football players getting ready to meet each other at the inaugural Sugar Bowl.

Image of the St. Malo Maroon community from an 1883 edition of Harper's Weekly.
The Historic New Orleans Collection

You live in a cave, six feet underground. You’re surrounded by wild animals, swarms of mosquitos, thick mud, and you can only come out at night. Why? Because it beats being a slave.

“They could live there for five, seven, 10 years”, says Sylviane Diouf, director of the Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, New York.

Sandra Knispel

In Mississippi, the Civil War still stirs emotions. It’s not so much that teachers disagree on how it should be taught, but that ongoing attempts by the University of Mississippi and several cities across the South to shed Confederate symbols have called up old ghosts. Mississippi Public Broadcasting's Sandra Knispel reports for the Southern Education Desk.

McIlhenny Company Archives, Avery Island, La

You know how you can walk into a mainstream clothing or household store, like Urban Outfitters, H&M, Pier One, and find indigenous designs printed across anything from a rug to a tank top? Well this is the hyperlocal origin story of how native aesthetics entered into non-native markets.

Last week’s TriPod saw an example of solidarity in opposition to slavery among people of African descent. But the dynamics within enslaved communities were complicated, and it was far from one big brotherhood. Allegiances were not automatic, and the story of a runaway named Francisque, who found his way to New Orleans in 1766, shows just that.

This week on the Reading Life:  Loyola University historian Eberhard "Lo" Faber, author of Building the Land of Dreams: New Orleans and the Transformation of Early America.  And military historian Antony Beevor, author of Ardennes 1944: The Battle of the Bulge, who's coming to town for the National World War II Museum's International Conference on World War II: 1945: The Bitter End.