History

Tulane University
7:00 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Major Civil War Collection Now Permanent At Tulane Library

A major collection of Civil War documents is now part of the permanent collection entrusted to Tulane University. The papers include those written by Confederate President Jefferson Davis as well as the diaries of soldiers.

Tulane University spokesman Leon Miller of the Louisiana Research Collection.

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Music Features
12:57 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Between The Stages: Music History Sites To Visit During French Quarter Fest

J&M Recording Studio, on the corner of Rampart and Dumaine Streets.
Credit Wally Gobetz / Flickr

The French Quarter is alive with music this weekend as the 30th annual French Quarter Festival kicks into high gear.

Music has been central to the identity of New Orleans from the earliest years of the city's founding, and a casual stroll through the streets of the French Quarter will bring you past centuries of tangible music history.

While you're down in the Quarter for the Festival, or any time at all, make sure you don't miss these landmarks.

J&M Recording Studio
840 North Rampart St. (corner of Dumaine)

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Red River Radio
9:32 am
Tue April 2, 2013

History Matters: On Preserving Dogtrot Homes

History Matters commentator Gary Joiner explores the historical significance of the dogtrot home, and why this type of architecture deserves to have a future.

Copyright 2013 KDAQ-FM. To see more, visit http://www.redriverradio.org/.

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World War II Museum
6:00 pm
Sun January 13, 2013

World War II Exhibit Asks Visitors, 'What Would You Do?'

The museum's U.S. Freedom Pavilion, seen here as a digital model, opened to the public on Friday.
Courtesy The National WWII Museum

For many, the stakes and the scale of World War II are hard to fathom. It was a war fought around the world, against powerful, determined regimes in Europe and the Pacific; some 65 million people died. And as the number of people who have actual memories of the war dwindle — as of next year, there will be fewer than 1 million living veterans — the mission of the National World War II Museum in New Orleans becomes all the more urgent.

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History
1:54 pm
Wed December 26, 2012

Presentation Recalls Battle of New Orleans

A program focused on the 198th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans is planned Jan. 10 at 6 p.m. at the Old U.S. Mint in the French Quarter.

Tulane University graduate student Shelene Roumillat will focus on how during the 19th century the anniversary of the battle was a major holiday in New Orleans.

In the battle, fought Jan. 8, 1815 — weeks after a peace treaty ended the War of 1812 — a force of American troops, pirates and local residents routed a British Army at a plantation in St. Bernard Parish.

Northwestern State University
1:13 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Northwestern State updates historical website

Northwestern State University has added new information on the university's history to its Traditions website.

The Times reports the Traditions site was set up earlier this year to recognize Northwestern State's heritage.

The new page — at traditions.nsula.edu/collections/our-heritage — has information on the legend of Isabella, the campus ghost; the Alma Mater; the Demon Fight Song; Vic the Demon and more.

The Listening Room
10:59 am
Thu August 2, 2012

You've Got Mail: A History Of The Post Office

These days, what we find in the mailbox tends to fall into one of two categories: junk mail or quaint hand-written reminders of times past.

While the mail may now vacillate between irritating or antiquated, for more than two hundred years the U.S. Post Office played a central role in American life. It was not only the institution that allowed us to communicate with each other across state lines and beyond, but it played a vital part in our country’s political organization and hierarchies.

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History
6:54 am
Sat July 14, 2012

50 Years Ago, Communications Became Global

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 3:54 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Fifty years ago this week, communications went global. July 12, 1962 the Telstar 1 satellite from AT&T became the first commercial spacecraft to beam television images from the United States to Europe.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

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Features
4:33 pm
Fri June 29, 2012

Independence Daze: A History of July Fourth

From: Backstory with the American History Guys: In the early days of our nation, July Fourth wasn’t an official holiday at all. In fact, it wasn’t until 1938 that it became a paid day-off. So how did the Fourth become the holiest day on our secular calendar?

Historian Pauline Maier offers some answers, and explains how radically the meaning of the Declaration has changed since 1776. James Heintze chronicles early Independence Day Bacchanalia. And historian David Blight reflects on Frederick Douglass’ arresting 1852 Independence Day speech.

Louisiana Statehood
9:54 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Louisiana Celebrates 200 Years of Statehood

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — When officials from the United States arrived in newly acquired Louisiana in 1804 to consider the prospects of the area for statehood, they found a bewildering landscape that could not have been more different from the New England countryside that gave birth to the nation just a few decades earlier.

The federal group found a population made up almost entirely of French-speakers, a third of whom were free people of color.

The delegation was perplexed, according to Connie Zeanah Atkinson, professor of U.S. history at the University of New Orleans.

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