Historic New Orleans Collection

Courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection

This episode of Louisiana Eats! examines African-American culinary life and culture in slavery times and today. Historic New Orleans Collection curator Erin Greenwald gives us a private tour of Purchased Lives: New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade, 1808–1865, an exhibit that examines the domestic slave trade in America. Solomon Northup, the free man of color who wrote the memoir "Twelve Years A Slave," comes to life with some amazing documents that shed light on his true story.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

Thursday marked the 200th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans, which influenced the course of American history and propelled Andrew Jackson to the Presidency.

The Historic New Orleans Collection currently has an exhibition on view entitled Andrew Jackson: Hero of New Orleans. WWNO’s Paul Maassen talked to HNOC’s Associate Director for the Williams Research Center, Jason Wiese, about the exhibit, Jackson, and the Battle's anniversary.

JoAnn Clevenger grew up in a strong Baptist community in northern Louisiana and eventually found her way to New Orleans.
Historic New Orleans Collection

JoAnn Clevenger had never even heard of Mardi Gras until she moved to New Orleans in the late 1950’s. She dropped out of Tulane to care for her mother and then moved to the French Quarter shortly thereafter. At that point in her life the jazz clubs, restaurants and literary circles she hung around weren’t like anything she’d seen.

Although they don't own the facility, Rene Brunet Jr.'s family has signed a 50-year agreement with the Prytania Theater that allows them to operate it exclusively.
Historic New Orleans Collection

When Rene Brunet Jr. was a kid, his father owned the Imperial Theater, a single-screen movie house in Mid-City. At the time, movie theaters were neighborhood institutions and played to the vaudeville expectations of the audience. But from the time he was a child, Rene saw the film industry undergo one transformation after another, which put his family’s business under constant pressure to change or get out of the way.

As a young child without reference, the crowds of protesters awaiting Leona Tate at McDonogh 19 in the Lower 9th Ward sounded like a boisterous Mardi Gras parade.
Historic New Orleans Collection

When the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that separate black and white schools were unconstitutional in Brown v. Board of Education, it seemed desegregation was close at hand. But it took six years before the New Orleans school system was integrated. In the fall of 1960, Leona Tate — then only 6 years old — was one of four young black girls escorted through a crowd of protestors.

Retired columnist Angus Lind's news beat was decidedly upbeat compared to the grave stories he followed as a young man in the 1970's.
The Historic New Orleans Collection

Angus Lind’s column in The Times-Picayune documented things that he described as, “a little offbeat”:  people, places and events that gave New Orleans its local color. But that didn’t come until later in his career. When he got started in the early 1970s as a young man, Angus was a general-assignment reporter who cut his teeth on a series of tragic events within a single calendar year.

During the 1984 World's Fair, Jeanne Nathan was not only beset on all sides by publicity issues, but she was also pregnant, which naturally added to her stress.
Historic New Orleans Collection


As the Director of Public Relations for the 1984 World's Fair, Jeanne Nathan had her work cut out for her.

The fair not only had to compete with the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, but it was challenged by an oil crash, political conflict, and bad publicity. It remains the only World’s Fair to declare bankruptcy during its run. Despite that, Jeanne feels New Orleans learned invaluable lessons in tourism and marketing that are still used today, but will be the first to admit that handling the Fair’s image was a constant uphill battle. 

Before his career in politics, deLesseps "Chep" Morrison earned the rank of major general in the Army Reserve during World War II.
Historic New Orleans Collection

deLesseps “Chep” Morrison was the mayor of New Orleans from 1946 to 1961. History will remember his administration as a polarizing one: he lured corporations to town, but also upheld segregationist values. He ran for Louisiana governor three times, and lost his final election in the winter of 1964. Months later, he spoke with future Lieutenant Governor Jimmy Fitzmorris, who still remembers their final conversation.

Chris Owens stands among her collection of memorabilia. Her Easter Parade has become a tradition for many families, some of whom travel internationally for the event.
Keely Merritt

As part of a new collaboration with The Historic New Orleans Collection, WWNO brings you NOLA Life Stories: an oral history project documenting the people, places and things that shape New Orleans. This week historian Mark Cave interviews Chris Owens, a Bourbon Street entertainer and nightclub owner.

Albinas Prizgintas, who started the Bach Around the Clock festival, began working at the Trinity Episcopal Church in 1988.
Eric Laws

As part of a new collaboration with The Historic New Orleans Collection, WWNO brings you NOLA Life Stories: an oral history project documenting the people, places and things that shape New Orleans. This week historian Mark Cave interviews Albinas and Manon Prizgintas, a married couple that produces Bach Around the Clock — an annual musical event held at Trinity Episcopal Church.