Historic New Orleans Collection

St. Bernard Fire Department via The Historic New Orleans Collection

This month, as part of WWNO's ongoing Katrina 10 coverage, we bring you The Katrina Files: Reflections from First Responders. This series is based on oral histories conducted by The Historic New Orleans Collection and hosted by Paul Maassen.

Chris Mickal

This month, as part of WWNO's ongoing Katrina 10 coverage, we bring you The Katrina Files: Reflections from First Responders. This series is based on oral histories conducted by The Historic New Orleans Collection and hosted by Paul Maassen.

This episode features interviews with the 39th Infantry Brigade of the Arkansas Army National Guard, which was the first unit called after Katrina to back up the Louisiana National Guard.

DMAT-CA6, via the Historic New Orleans Collection

This month, as part of WWNO's ongoing Katrina 10 coverage, we bring you The Katrina Files: Reflections from First Responders. This series is based on oral histories conducted by The Historic New Orleans Collection and hosted by Paul Maassen.

LDWF, Via Historic New Orleans Collection

This month, as part of WWNO's ongoing Katrina+10 coverage, we bring you The Katrina Files: Reflections of First Responders — selections from oral histories conducted by The Historic New Orleans Collection and hosted by Paul Maassen.

Former governor Kathleen Blanco is interviewed by historian Mark Cave.
Michael Wynne

Kathleen Blanco is the only woman to be elected governor of Louisiana, and was at the helm when Hurricane Katrina laid waste to the Gulf Coast. She admits that the challenges of the storm were too much for state and local governments to handle.

The National WWII Museum

Inspired by the stories of World War II veterans, the late University of New Orleans historian Stephen Ambrose wanted to build a museum that would honor their experience.

courtesy of the Holden Family Collection

Most Americans hear the phrase “slave trade” and picture ships sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, with captured Africans chained inside, terrorized and sick. But twice as many people were sold in the domestic slave trade, which forcibly moved over a million people, primarily from the Upper South to the Lower South, primarily over land and on foot.

After the United States outlawed international slave trading in 1808, New Orleans became home to the nation’s largest domestic slave market.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

For 37 years, John Bullard directed the New Orleans Museum of Art and oversaw many blockbuster shows during his tenure.

French Impressionists always drew large crowds, and subjects like The Gold of El Dorado and Alexander the Great were well received, but none compared to the Treasures of Tutankhamun. The ancient boy king had become a cultural sensation by the late 1970s, when New Orleans became ground zero for "Tut-Mania."

Courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection

This episode of Louisiana Eats! examines African-American culinary life and culture in slavery times and today. Historic New Orleans Collection curator Erin Greenwald gives us a private tour of Purchased Lives: New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade, 1808–1865, an exhibit that examines the domestic slave trade in America. Solomon Northup, the free man of color who wrote the memoir "Twelve Years A Slave," comes to life with some amazing documents that shed light on his true story.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

Thursday marked the 200th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans, which influenced the course of American history and propelled Andrew Jackson to the Presidency.

The Historic New Orleans Collection currently has an exhibition on view entitled Andrew Jackson: Hero of New Orleans. WWNO’s Paul Maassen talked to HNOC’s Associate Director for the Williams Research Center, Jason Wiese, about the exhibit, Jackson, and the Battle's anniversary.

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