Historic New Orleans Collection

Nola Life Stories
5:00 am
Fri November 21, 2014

JoAnn Clevenger, Or How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The French Quarter

JoAnn Clevenger grew up in a strong Baptist community in northern Louisiana and eventually found her way to New Orleans. She worries that without a central place to call their own, the bohemians and small business owners of the French Quarter will be ousted from the historic neighborhood.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

JoAnn Clevenger had never even heard of Mardi Gras until she moved to New Orleans in the late 1950’s. She dropped out of Tulane to care for her mother and then moved to the French Quarter shortly thereafter. At that point in her life the jazz clubs, restaurants and literary circles she hung around weren’t like anything she’d seen.

    

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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Mon October 13, 2014

Rene Brunet Jr.'s Lifetime Serving The Silver Screen

Although they don't own the facility, Rene Brunet Jr.'s family has signed a 50-year agreement with the Prytania Theater that allows them to operate it exclusively.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

When Rene Brunet Jr. was a kid, his father owned the Imperial Theater, a single-screen movie house in Mid-City. At the time, movie theaters were neighborhood institutions and played to the vaudeville expectations of the audience. But from the time he was a child, Rene saw the film industry undergo one transformation after another, which put his family’s business under constant pressure to change or get out of the way.   

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Nola Life Stories
5:00 am
Tue September 2, 2014

A First-Hand Account Of Integration: Leona Tate Looks Back At McDonogh 19

As a young child without reference, the crowds of protesters awaiting Leona Tate at McDonogh 19 in the Lower 9th Ward sounded like a boisterous Mardi Gras parade.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

When the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that separate black and white schools were unconstitutional in Brown v. Board of Education, it seemed desegregation was close at hand. But it took six years before the New Orleans school system was integrated. In the fall of 1960, Leona Tate — then only 6 years old — was one of four young black girls escorted through a crowd of protestors.

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Nola Life Stories
5:00 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Reporting From The Front Line: Angus Lind's Distinguished Journalism Career

Retired columnist Angus Lind's news beat was decidedly upbeat compared to the grave stories he followed as a young man in the 1970's.
Credit The Historic New Orleans Collection

Angus Lind’s column in The Times-Picayune documented things that he described as, “a little offbeat”:  people, places and events that gave New Orleans its local color. But that didn’t come until later in his career. When he got started in the early 1970s as a young man, Angus was a general-assignment reporter who cut his teeth on a series of tragic events within a single calendar year.

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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Tue May 27, 2014

The Bright Side Of An Economic Disaster: Jeanne Nathan Reflects On The 1984 World's Fair

During the 1984 World's Fair, Jeanne Nathan was not only beset on all sides by publicity issues, but she was also pregnant, which naturally added to her stress.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

As the Director of Public Relations for the 1984 World's Fair, Jeanne Nathan had her work cut out for her.

The fair not only had to compete with the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, but it was challenged by an oil crash, political conflict, and bad publicity. It remains the only World’s Fair to declare bankruptcy during its run. Despite that, Jeanne feels New Orleans learned invaluable lessons in tourism and marketing that are still used today, but will be the first to admit that handling the Fair’s image was a constant uphill battle. 

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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Wed May 21, 2014

50 Years Later: The Startling Death Of Former Mayor Chep Morrison

Before his career in politics, deLesseps "Chep" Morrison earned the rank of major general in the Army Reserve during World War II.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

deLesseps “Chep” Morrison was the mayor of New Orleans from 1946 to 1961. History will remember his administration as a polarizing one: he lured corporations to town, but also upheld segregationist values. He ran for Louisiana governor three times, and lost his final election in the winter of 1964. Months later, he spoke with future Lieutenant Governor Jimmy Fitzmorris, who still remembers their final conversation.    


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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Get Ready To Ride: Chris Owens' French Quarter Easter Parade

Chris Owens stands among her collection of memorabilia. Her Easter Parade has become a tradition for many families, some of whom travel internationally for the event.
Credit Keely Merritt

As part of a new collaboration with The Historic New Orleans Collection, WWNO brings you NOLA Life Stories: an oral history project documenting the people, places and things that shape New Orleans. This week historian Mark Cave interviews Chris Owens, a Bourbon Street entertainer and nightclub owner.

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NOLA Life Stories
9:00 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Communing Through Eternal Sound: Bach Around The Clock Celebrates 17 Years

Albinas Prizgintas, who started the Bach Around the Clock festival, began working at the Trinity Episcopal Church in 1988.
Credit Eric Laws

As part of a new collaboration with The Historic New Orleans Collection, WWNO brings you NOLA Life Stories: an oral history project documenting the people, places and things that shape New Orleans. This week historian Mark Cave interviews Albinas and Manon Prizgintas, a married couple that produces Bach Around the Clock — an annual musical event held at Trinity Episcopal Church.

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Music
4:41 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Join Us For The LPO's Live Broadcast: 'Postcards From Paris'

Join us for a special live broadcast of Postcards From Paris, presented by The Historic New Orleans Collection and the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra.

The show begins at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, February 19 on 89.9 WWNO and 90.5 KTLN, and will also stream live on LPOmusic.com

Overture to Les Mousquetaires au couvent
by Louis Varney

“Don Ottavio, son morta! . . . Or sai, chi l’onore” 
from Don Giovanni 
by W.A. Mozart

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Features
11:45 am
Thu October 31, 2013

Historic New Orleans Collection Exhibit Examines Occupation Of City During Civil War

Commodore Farragut’s Squadron and Captain Porter’s Mortar Fleet Entering the Mississippi from Harper’s Weekly; May 17, 1862; print; The Historic New Orleans Collection, 1978.205
The Historic New Orleans Collection

New Orleans, the largest and most prosperous city in the antebellum Deep South, spent the Civil War in fetters, occupied by Union troops in late April 1862.

The Historic New Orleans Collection's latest exhibit, "Occupy New Orleans! Voices from the Civil War", taps the experiences of ordinary men and women — Northerners and Southerners alike — during that time. WWNO's Paul Maassen talked with Mark Cave, The Historic New Orleans Collection's Senior Curator and Oral Historian, and asked him about this unique exhibit.

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