health

Chastising the NFL Players Association for "remarkable recalcitrance" on testing for human growth hormone, two members of Congress have pledged "to take a more active role" on the issue and say they could ask players to testify before their committee.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee chairman Darrell Issa, a California Republican, and ranking Democrat Elijah Cummings of Maryland tell NFLPA head DeMaurice Smith in a letter sent Monday that the union "has prevented meaningful progress on this issue."

A University of New Orleans faculty member has been awarded a state grant to develop a device to test testosterone levels in real time.

Elizabeth Shirtcliff was awarded the grant by the Louisiana Board of Regents. She is an early research professor of psychology at UNO ad the principal investigator on the project. Shirtcliff is partnering with researchers from at Oasis Diagnostic Corp. in Canada.

Monitoring testosterone levels is important, Shirtclif said, because rapid imbalances can signal changes in behavior.

Saints quarterback Drew Brees joined former teammate Steve Gleason in accepting a donation for technology that can help people living with ALS and multiple sclerosis. Gleason showed off the technology that he says will help other patients live richer lives.

Gleason says when he was diagnosed two years ago with ALS, he didn’t know how to cope with the condition that’s left him in a wheelchair and unable to speak. But his wheelchair now has equipment that allows him to talk, as directed by his eyes.

In a December article for The New Republic, "The Grayest Generation: How Older Parenthood Will Upend American Society," the magazine's science editor Judith Shulevitz points out how the growing trend toward later parenthood since 1970 coincides with a rise in neurocognitive and developmental disorders among children.

Loyola Biology Lab Regenerates Limb Joints

Dec 18, 2012
Loyola University

In a biology lab at Loyola University New Orleans, something miraculous happened — something no scientist had seen before. Biology professor Rosalie Anderson and her undergraduate students cut a tiny hole to remove just the elbow joint of a chicken embryo’s wing. Eighteen hours later, a new joint amazingly grew back.

For the first time, the nation's pediatricians are wading into the controversy over whether organic food is better for you – and they're coming down on the side of parents who say it is, at least in part.

To Know Is to Love

Oct 19, 2012

Men, did you know that we hurt people when we chose not to learn? Aldous Huxley said, “We can only love what we know, and we can never know completely what we do not love.”

That Huxley quote always reminds me of the never-ending responsibility to learn about the people I claim to love. Intimacy comes out of the scrutiny of our desires, shames and delights. Therefore, loving is not just learning how to be vulnerable; it’s being vulnerable enough to learn.

The National Institutes of Health says it will relocate 110 of its chimpanzees from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's New Iberia Research Center and to stop using the animals for biomedical testing.

The Advocate reports that the plan was announced Friday.

The move comes as NIH decides how best to implement recommendations that call for more stringent standards on biomedical research using chimpanzees, considered the closest relative to humans in the animal kingdom.

A federal court has awarded a Denver man $7.2 million in a lawsuit he filed against a popcorn maker and a grocery store for selling him microwaved popcorn that made him sick.

The 'Facebook Effect' On Organ Donation

Sep 20, 2012

Facebook is taking its campaign to boost organ donations to Canada and Mexico this week, four months after its premiere.

The feature allows Facebook users to tell their friends and family that they're registered organ donors. It also directs people who aren't signed up as organ donors to the official registries where they live.

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