health

COASTAL DESK

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The Working Coast: Economic Downturn Strains Louisiana's Long Relationship With Oil And Gas

A sudden drop in oil prices last year has brought huge challenges to the state of Louisiana — more than 10,000 layoffs in the oil and gas sector and a $400 million hit to the state budget. Long known for its “working coast” — represented by shipping, fishing and industry in south Louisiana and along the Mississippi River — the downturn brings with it something of an identity crisis.
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TRIPOD: NEW ORLEANS AT 300

The Historic New Orleans Collection

'The Monster': Claiborne Avenue Before And After The Interstate

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its highway series. This is the story of the I-10 interstate bridge that sits above Claiborne Avenue. Part one of this story was about the proposed Riverfront Expressway through the French Quarter and along the Mississippi River. That leg of the highway did not happen, and the French Quarter was saved from being demolished under a freeway. But that same year, 1968, a different section of the Riverfront Expressway did go up. Under that part? The Treme neighborhood, along Claiborne Avenue.
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NPR NEWS

'El Chapo' Extradition To U.S. May Proceed, Mexican Judge Says

Two days after drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán was transferred to a prison near Juárez, a Mexican city near the U.S. border, a federal judge in Mexico said the extradition process can move forward.An unnamed judge said the "legal requirements laid out in the extradition treaty" between the U.S. and Mexico had been met, The Associated Press reports, adding that Mexico's foreign ministry has 20 days to approve the extradition.NPR's Carrie Kahn reported in January that Guzmán had been ...
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Tegan Wendland / WWNO

A sudden drop in oil prices last year has brought huge challenges to the state of Louisiana — more than 10,000 layoffs in the oil and gas sector and a $400 million hit to the state budget. Long known for its “working coast” — represented by shipping, fishing and industry in south Louisiana and along the Mississippi River — the downturn brings with it something of an identity crisis.

This week on Le Show: Harry Shearer gets a call from Donald Trump, B-Rock's Water Warehouse, News of NiceCorp, Tales from Airport Security, News of the Godly, Follow the DollarLet Us Try, and more!

This Continuum presents unique contemporary performances of medieval music in accordance with the modern revival of music from this period, hence the name, Neo-Medieval. The three ensembles are have been highly praised for their approaches to performing this music. All are different from each other but each gives excellent interpretations of the selections. Recordings used are: Sapphire Night  (Tapestry) - MDG 344 1193-2, Neo-Medieval (Hesperus) - Dorian DIS 80155, and Darkness Into Light (Anonymous 4) - Harmonia Mundi HMU 907274.

Rodrigo Mondragon and host Poppy Tooker. Rodrigo is co-owner of Ki’ Mexico, a Shreveport restaurant he runs with members of his family.
Chris Jay

On this week's show, we journey across the state to learn about the flourishing flavors of Latin American cuisine in Louisiana.

This week on Inside the Arts, one of the world's rarest books lands in New Orleans. The nationally traveling exhibit, First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare opens Uptown at the Newcomb Art Museum.

Courtesy Richard Campanella

Each month we hear from Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. This time, WWNO’s Eve Troeh talks to him about how New Orleans started “going Greek” in architecture, with the Greek Revival movement hitting the city in the early 1800s.

Although New Orleans has religious universities, public and private universities, and historically black colleges and universities which - taken together - have very diverse student bodies, the city lacks diversity in its higher education faculty.

McNulty family photo

This one is about mothers who work hard, have to juggle, still get dinner on the table, and the kids who don't really get it at the time but end up loving them even more once they finally do.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you’ve ever had folks come visit you in New Orleans from out of town, they’ve probably said, “If I lived here I’d put on a hundred pounds.”

This Out to Lunch is all about how to kick ass, and what to do after your ass gets kicked.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its highway series. This is the story of the I-10 interstate bridge that sits above Claiborne Avenue.

Part one of this story was about the proposed Riverfront Expressway through the French Quarter and along the Mississippi River. That leg of the highway did not happen, and the French Quarter was saved from being demolished under a freeway. But that same year, 1968, a different section of the Riverfront Expressway did go up. Under that part? The Treme neighborhood, along Claiborne Avenue.

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LOUISIANA EATS!

Rodrigo Mondragon and host Poppy Tooker. Rodrigo is co-owner of Ki’ Mexico, a Shreveport restaurant he runs with members of his family.
Chris Jay

South Of The Border With Louisiana Eats

On this week's show, we journey across the state to learn about the flourishing flavors of Latin American cuisine in Louisiana.
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CLASSICAL MUSIC

Classical Music on WWNO

Beautiful classical music, from traditional to contemporary, on Classical WWNO.

LE SHOW

Le Show For The Week Of May 8, 2016

This week on Le Show: Harry Shearer gets a call from Donald Trump, B-Rock's Water Warehouse, News of NiceCorp, Tales from Airport Security, News of the Godly, Follow the Dollar, Let Us Try, and more!
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Super Bowl XLVII will kick off Sunday with its typical bombastic fanfare: Beyonce will wow us with her live halftime show, and "space baby" commercials will overload us with cuteness.

But this year, there's a gray cloud hanging over the Super Bowl: the mounting anger about devastating injuries to players' brains and bodies.

Several San Francisco 49ers say they would have no problem if their sons played football, even though President Obama has questioned the safety of the game.

During an interview Monday at the Super Bowl, All-Pro linebacker Aldon Smith responded to a question about the president's comments by saying anyone involved in the sport knows the requirements. Smith says, "It's not like we signed up and thought we were going to play tennis."

Guard Alex Boone says football has to be "physical," and that if his children want to play, they can.

Chastising the NFL Players Association for "remarkable recalcitrance" on testing for human growth hormone, two members of Congress have pledged "to take a more active role" on the issue and say they could ask players to testify before their committee.

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee chairman Darrell Issa, a California Republican, and ranking Democrat Elijah Cummings of Maryland tell NFLPA head DeMaurice Smith in a letter sent Monday that the union "has prevented meaningful progress on this issue."

A University of New Orleans faculty member has been awarded a state grant to develop a device to test testosterone levels in real time.

Elizabeth Shirtcliff was awarded the grant by the Louisiana Board of Regents. She is an early research professor of psychology at UNO ad the principal investigator on the project. Shirtcliff is partnering with researchers from at Oasis Diagnostic Corp. in Canada.

Monitoring testosterone levels is important, Shirtclif said, because rapid imbalances can signal changes in behavior.

Saints quarterback Drew Brees joined former teammate Steve Gleason in accepting a donation for technology that can help people living with ALS and multiple sclerosis. Gleason showed off the technology that he says will help other patients live richer lives.

Gleason says when he was diagnosed two years ago with ALS, he didn’t know how to cope with the condition that’s left him in a wheelchair and unable to speak. But his wheelchair now has equipment that allows him to talk, as directed by his eyes.

In a December article for The New Republic, "The Grayest Generation: How Older Parenthood Will Upend American Society," the magazine's science editor Judith Shulevitz points out how the growing trend toward later parenthood since 1970 coincides with a rise in neurocognitive and developmental disorders among children.

Loyola Biology Lab Regenerates Limb Joints

Dec 18, 2012
Loyola University

In a biology lab at Loyola University New Orleans, something miraculous happened — something no scientist had seen before. Biology professor Rosalie Anderson and her undergraduate students cut a tiny hole to remove just the elbow joint of a chicken embryo’s wing. Eighteen hours later, a new joint amazingly grew back.

For the first time, the nation's pediatricians are wading into the controversy over whether organic food is better for you – and they're coming down on the side of parents who say it is, at least in part.

To Know Is to Love

Oct 19, 2012

Men, did you know that we hurt people when we chose not to learn? Aldous Huxley said, “We can only love what we know, and we can never know completely what we do not love.”

That Huxley quote always reminds me of the never-ending responsibility to learn about the people I claim to love. Intimacy comes out of the scrutiny of our desires, shames and delights. Therefore, loving is not just learning how to be vulnerable; it’s being vulnerable enough to learn.

The National Institutes of Health says it will relocate 110 of its chimpanzees from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's New Iberia Research Center and to stop using the animals for biomedical testing.

The Advocate reports that the plan was announced Friday.

The move comes as NIH decides how best to implement recommendations that call for more stringent standards on biomedical research using chimpanzees, considered the closest relative to humans in the animal kingdom.

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