health

Science & Health
11:55 am
Tue December 18, 2012

Loyola Biology Lab Regenerates Limb Joints

Loyola University professor Rosalie Anderson, along with biology major Jeffrey Coote, work to regenerate chicken embryo elbow joints in the lab.
Loyola University

In a biology lab at Loyola University New Orleans, something miraculous happened — something no scientist had seen before. Biology professor Rosalie Anderson and her undergraduate students cut a tiny hole to remove just the elbow joint of a chicken embryo’s wing. Eighteen hours later, a new joint amazingly grew back.

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The Salt
2:28 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Docs Say Choose Organic Food To Reduce Kids' Exposure To Pesticides

Parents now have more advice to consider when it comes to choosing organic foods. Here, Theo Shriver, 6, weighs organic produce at the Puget Consumers Co-op in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 2:36 pm

For the first time, the nation's pediatricians are wading into the controversy over whether organic food is better for you – and they're coming down on the side of parents who say it is, at least in part.

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Andre Perry Commentary
5:05 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

To Know Is to Love

Men, did you know that we hurt people when we chose not to learn? Aldous Huxley said, “We can only love what we know, and we can never know completely what we do not love.”

That Huxley quote always reminds me of the never-ending responsibility to learn about the people I claim to love. Intimacy comes out of the scrutiny of our desires, shames and delights. Therefore, loving is not just learning how to be vulnerable; it’s being vulnerable enough to learn.

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Biomedical Research
11:51 am
Mon September 24, 2012

110 chimps to be removed from ULL center

The National Institutes of Health says it will relocate 110 of its chimpanzees from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's New Iberia Research Center and to stop using the animals for biomedical testing.

The Advocate reports that the plan was announced Friday.

The move comes as NIH decides how best to implement recommendations that call for more stringent standards on biomedical research using chimpanzees, considered the closest relative to humans in the animal kingdom.

The Salt
2:51 pm
Thu September 20, 2012

Man Wins $7 Million In Suit Claiming Microwave Popcorn Caused Lung Disease

Wayne Watson, who just won a $7 million lawsuit, explains how a bag of popcorn would "whoof" when opened, releasing steam and flavor.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 7:04 pm

A federal court has awarded a Denver man $7.2 million in a lawsuit he filed against a popcorn maker and a grocery store for selling him microwaved popcorn that made him sick.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:17 am
Thu September 20, 2012

The 'Facebook Effect' On Organ Donation

Facebook is taking its campaign to boost organ donations to Canada and Mexico this week, four months after its premiere.

The feature allows Facebook users to tell their friends and family that they're registered organ donors. It also directs people who aren't signed up as organ donors to the official registries where they live.

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The Salt
11:21 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Fruit And Veggies Linked To Lower Obesity Rates In New State Fat Rankings

Customers line up for farmers market produce on a corner in Washington, D.C., where people eat more fruits and veggies than in many states.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:32 pm

Every year, we dutifully report on the annual Trust for America's Health and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation state obesity rankings, and every year, it's a similar story — a handful of southern states, on the whole, are the biggest. (It's Mississippi, Louisiana, and West Virginia in 2011, in case you were wondering.)

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Science & Health
1:01 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

LSUHSC: Ginkgo doesn't help brain in MS patients

A study at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans has found that the popular dietary supplement ginkgo biloba doesn't improve mental function in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Neurologist Jesus Lovera did the study on 120 people because an earlier, smaller study had seemed promising. Ginkgo is taken by many people who have the disease, which attacks the myelin that insulates nerve fibers. About 40 to 60 percent of multiple sclerosis patients develop problems with memory or other cognitive functions.

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The Salt
9:35 am
Mon September 17, 2012

U.S. Kids Eat Nearly As Much Salt As Adults, Putting Health At Risk

It's going to take a lot more than emptying the salt shaker to cut back on the sodium U.S. kids are getting.
L. Marie Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:42 pm

Yes, we love salt. It makes everything taste better. But as a society, we're eating way too much of it. And, so are our children.

A new study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that children in the U.S. between the ages of 8 and 18 are eating, on average, 3,387 mg per day. That's about the same amount as adults. But it's a lot more than the 2,300 mg daily limit recommended by the federal dietary guidelines.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:53 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

How Your Job Could Hurt Your Heart

Lack of control and high demands make work stressful.
iStockphoto.com

Stress on the job may raise your risk of a heart attack.

European researchers came to that conclusion after looking at the experience of nearly 200,000 people who took part in 13 different studies. The scientists found that people with stressful jobs had a 23 percent higher risk of heart attack than those whose jobs weren't pressure cookers.

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