health care

Clarence Williams

WWNO’s series Kids, Trauma and New Orleans Schools looks at how trauma shows up in the classroom. Our reporting has focused on one New Orleans pre-K through 8th grade school, Crocker College Prep, as it makes changes to account for high levels of trauma in the city’s children. New Orleans kids screen positive for PTSD at rates three times higher than the national average. Our final story in the series takes a closer look at what it takes to run a trauma-informed school.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

We’ve seen major sectors of the US economy change over the last few years. Retail and energy have both been shaken up. But probably nothing has gotten more people shaken up than changes in healthcare.

Peter's guests on this edition of Out to Lunch are shaking up healthcare in New Orleans.

The state health department has agreed to provide more bed space for Louisiana inmates found incompetent to stand trial and those found not guilty of crimes by reason of insanity. 

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

Governor John Bel Edwards toured the new University Medical Center in New Orleans on Wednesday before launching the start of enrollment in the Medicaid expansion. Officials expect as many as 375,0000 more people will qualify for health care, with about one-third coming from the New Orleans region.

Photo by Pat Jolly, courtesy New Orleans Musicians' Clinic

Community Impact is WWNO's series on nonprofit organizations in the New Orleans region, a partnership between WWNO and the Greater New Orleans Foundation. In this edition Jasmin Lopez visits the New Orleans Musicians' Clinic.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

New businesses are springing up in New Orleans all the time. Some of them you may not have heard of. Others you can’t miss.

We talk with MHM Urgent Care, an Infusion Therapist, and an alcohol delivery service!

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

When you are down on your luck in Louisiana, dental care can be hard to come by. Medicare doesn’t cover it for adults, so many low-income people have to rely on volunteer dentists and special clinics that often have long waitlists. In Covington, the Food Bank has made helping these people a priority.

The Food Bank provides food for those in need, but they also have a thrift store, an emergency assistance center and a dental clinic. They call these their “core ministries,” and hope the services target the community’s primary needs.

Donna Landry, executive director of the Richard Murphy Hospice House, and staff member Darick Selders, work to make patients comfortable during their last days of life.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

On a quiet little cul-de-sac in Hammond, there is a special place where people go to die. The Richard Murphy Hospice House offers an alternative to the clinical setting of a nursing home for people during their last days of life.

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, much of the physical damage the storm caused in the city of New Orleans has been repaired. Neighborhoods and communities have been rebuilt. Schools, hospitals, businesses, and restaurants have re-opened.

But as Laine Kaplan-Levenson of WWNO in New Orleans reports, a deeper, invisible wound brought by the storm remains. Thousands of residents, and especially children, were traumatized by the storm and the displacement and struggle that followed.

Jack Hua is a third year medical school student at Tulane University.  "It's such an enormous feat to get into medical school.  We've been working hard for a really long time.  The specialties make so much more money.  Obviously, someone making $150,000 a year is going to be well-off, it's just that when you compare that to $450,000..." he says.


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