health

Jenn Lormond, Betty Archote and Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

It would be hard to find anybody in America who doesn’t know that there’s a link between diet and health. It would, however, be no problem to find a hundred people on your street who want to eat healthier but don’t. Our usual excuses are -- healthy food is harder to find, it’s expensive, and it doesn’t taste good.

Jenn Lormond and Betty Archote share a healthy lunch and some enlightening conversation with Peter Ricchiuti on this edition of Out to Lunch.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you’ve ever had folks come visit you in New Orleans from out of town, they’ve probably said, “If I lived here I’d put on a hundred pounds.”

This Out to Lunch is all about how to kick ass, and what to do after your ass gets kicked.

One of The Remedy Room's mobile clinics stationed on a street in New Orleans.
Poppy Tooker

It's really true what they say: You are what you eat — and drink! On this week's show, we call in the experts to learn about the effects of our eating and drinking habits on the human mind, body and spirit.

An effective and non-addictive painkiller has been developed by researchers at Tulane University with the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System. The new compound has been in the works since a 1997 discovery of a brain receptor.

Fighting For Health Care Reform, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, 2009.
Health Care For America Now / flickr.com

The mayor’s office is working to get more New Orleanians enrolled in health coverage, and is asking barbershops and beauty salons around the city to help.

A new study involving a Tulane expert on child psychology shows that quality foster care can help reverse damage done to abused boys. Without the intervention, children can become callous and unemotional.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

School is back in session. And there's a new option for students with severe mental and behavioral health needs: the New Orleans Therapeutic Day Program. The program recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony.

It’s called the “brain-eating” amoeba, and Naegleria fowleri has been found in three Louisiana water systems this summer.

“Where we’ve found most of the amoeba so far, in our testing, has been surface water,” State Public Health Officer Dr. Jimmy Guidry told the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday. He says the systems that have tested positive – St. Bernard Parish, Ascension District 1, and Schriever in Terrebonne Parish -- are boosting chlorine to kill the single-celled organisms and clean the pipes that carry water to homes and businesses.

Compassion and Cannabis

Apr 30, 2015

A bill that would set up rules and the system for dispensing medical marijuana advanced out of the Senate Health and Welfare Committee Wednesday. Although law enforcement opposition has derailed similar bills in previous sessions, the difference with Fred Mills’ SB 143 was the support of the Louisiana Sheriffs’ Association.

“The move that our sheriffs made was to be compassionate; was to do things to provide relief,” Sheriffs’ Association director Mike Renatza testified, “And to hopefully not harm anyone.”

Renatza said each sheriff examined his own conscience, and asked themselves, “What would you do? What would you do for your son? What would you do for your daughter?”

A new 66-page comic book imagined by two medical librarians at LSU Health Shreveport will help kindergarteners and first graders better understand obesity.

Talicia Tarver’s “The Amazing Captain Fit” is a story about a boy who wants to be a superhero but lacks healthy eating habits. The comic book, published today, will be distributed through the Department of Pediatrics’ Reach Out and Read program. Tarver wanted to embed the message in something that kids and parents would both enjoy.

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