french quarter

Cityscapes: When Bourbon Street Was Elite

Jan 7, 2016
Getty Images

Each month Richard Campanella talks to WWNO about his Cityscapes column for NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune. This month: Bourbon Street.

The Historic New Orleans Collection, 1974.25.23.4

This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. This story visits physical landmarks that bear witness to the city’s role in the national slave trade.

Historic New Orleans Collection

This story is part of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city's past to help us better understand present and future challenges. 

Is it cliche to tell a story about Italians that involves wine, extortion and murder? Maybe. Is it about to happen? Definitely.

From haunted restaurants to spine-chilling cemeteries, we explore the spooky side of Louisiana on this week's show.
Sally Asher

It's that time of year, when the cemeteries of Louisiana come alive and the streets are haunted by tethered spirits.

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we celebrate All Hallows' Eve by time traveling through the storied tombs of St. Louis Cemetery No. 3 with photographer and historian Sally Asher. Sally takes us through the grave sites of our dearly departed culinary legends, and we hear some spooky stories along the way.

Thomas Walsh

People’s expectations about “entertainment” aren’t what they used to be. What passed for fun as little as 10 years ago can’t compete with the stimulating, instant gratification of our iWorld.

The owners of the Musee Conti Wax Museum know this too well: earlier this year they sold the building, which will close in January and be replaced by a set of condominiums. Sandra Weil gave tours there for nearly 30 years and shares the back story of the museum.

Historic New Orleans Collection

When Sal Impastato handed over the keys of the Napoleon House this past spring, it was an emotional moment.

Selling the business to restauranteur Ralph Brennan had been a difficult decision because the building had been in Sal’s family for generations – first as a grocery, then as a bar.

Angie Garrett / Flickr

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we set out to discover hot spots both literally and figuratively in our backyard.

Dennis Brady and Peter Ricchiuti.
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

A lot of tourists who come to New Orleans go home and describe the city as an oasis of European-looking streets lined with music clubs where people wander around drinking cocktails and eating beignets 24 hours a day. This fabulous wonderland is the same 13 riverside blocks that locals describe as dirty, smelly, crime-ridden, home to gutter punks, T-shirt shops, and over-priced restaurants they wouldn’t go to even if they could find a parking place.

wikicommons

Since the debate over the noise ordinance came to a standstill last April, live music advocates and neighborhood groups are stuck with an unlikely piece of legislation to deal with sound in the city:  zoning.

It’s early evening on Frenchmen Street, and the doors of this bar are wide open. Tourists are drifting in and out, and the music is free. It’s also illegal.

Richard Campanella

As NBC announces the 6-month, unpaid suspension of news anchor Brian Williams, controversy over the truth of many of his high-profile reporting trips continues.

While the scandal erupted related to questions about Iraq, in 2003, it has also brought into question Williams’ 2005 reporting in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Among other claims, Williams reported floodwaters around his French Quarter hotel.

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