food

The Historic New Orleans Collection

This is the third episode of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tri (for the city's three centuries) Pod (for podcast), and Tripod, the tool that steadies an image when you capture something. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on the forgotten, neglected, or surprising. It helps us better understand present and future challenges.

This story looks at the arrival of Croatian people, and the split communities between the bayou and the city.

Thibodaux-born Chef Jean-Paul Bourgeois and hospitality guru Danny Meyer at the 2015 Big Apple Barbecue Block Party.
Nicole Savitsky

There are few businesses harder to succeed in than the restaurant business. On this week's show, we hear some of America's greatest success stories from the hospitality world.

Boudin from the New Orleans butcher shop Bourree at Boucherie.
Ian McNulty

Travel around Cajun country and it seems that no town is too small to have its own a car wash, its own dance studio and its own butcher shop — one with tasso and andouille and a universe of smoked, trussed, seasoned, stuffed and double-stuffed meats, and hot links of boudin and paper sacks of cracklin’ to eat on the spot. 

Only recently have more of those Cajun meat markets been turning up in New Orleans, but now more New Orleans neighborhoods can claim their own.

"Man, in New Orleans we really are fortunate — we got some of the best things in the world," Chef Paul Prudhomme once said. "And one of those things is the muffuletta sandwich."

And one of the best things about New Orleans was Prudhomme himself.

He was known for introducing blackened redfish to the rest of us, for his cooking demos and for his line of magic spices. Needless to say, Prudhomme changed the way the world saw Louisiana cooking.

He has died at the age of 75.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

Paul Prudhomme, the internationally-known New Orleans chef and restaurateur, has died. He was 75.

Prudhomme popularized Cajun and Creole cooking in the 1980’s. His death was confirmed by his restaurant, K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen, according to WWL-TV.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

This is the second episode of TriPod: New Orleans at 300. Tri (for the city's three centuries) Pod (for podcast), and Tripod, the tool that steadies an image when you capture something. Tripod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on the forgotten, neglected, or surprising. It helps us better understand present and future challenges. This is the story of one man’s family business, part of the Chinese immigrant community, that helped build New Orleans.

Eve Abrams

The Youth Development Program at Liberty’s Kitchen provides participants with occupational and employability skills training, and addresses the social issues that have created barriers to employment.

The objective of the Youth Development Program is to graduate students with a sense of purpose, tools and opportunities needed to thrive in gainful employment.

Across Louisiana and the entire country, there is a substance abuse problem in bars and restaurants.
Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr

Since we began broadcasting Louisiana Eats! over five years ago, we've noticed a recurring theme when speaking with chefs, bartenders and restaurant owners about a certain aspect of the hospitality and service industry culture. From the front of the house to the back, across Louisiana and the entire country, there is a substance abuse problem in bars and restaurants.

Off bottom cultivation is bringing a different flavor to Gulf oysters.
Ian McNulty

If we're at the oyster bar, and we're in Louisiana, when we talk about trying something new, we're usually not talking about the oyster.

New might mean sampling a cocktail sauce with a little extra mojo in it, or maybe even field testing some new jokes the shucker picked up. But for the oyster itself, we know exactly what to expect.

Ben Burkett

When the Crescent City Farmers Market was founded 20 years ago, farmers in nearby rural areas were hesitant about coming to New Orleans. To them the city was a haven of crime and traffic, but connecting the city to the farm created more opportunities than they imagined.

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