food

Joyce N. Boghosian / The White House

Leah Chase: say the name and New Orleanians know exactly who you’re talking about. She’s a great chef, a civil rights activist, and an avid art collector. And it’s not a stretch to say that – to some people – she’s the maternal figure of the city. On this edition of Nola Life Stories, Leah Chase, in her own words.  

This interview was conducted by Mark Cave for the Historic New Orleans Collection.

We've got a veritable cornucopia of Thanksgiving stories to share on this week's Louisiana Eats!
vxla / Flickr

This week on Louisiana Eats!, we gather around the table to delve into Thanksgiving traditions old and new. We hear about an unlikely culinary partnership between cookbook author Brandon Schultz and his cat, Lucy Schultz-Osenlund, who collaborated on a cookbook called Cooking for Two: Your Cat & You, a collection of recipes that will appeal to both man and man's best feline friend. Brandon tells us how he and Lucy celebrate something we're calling Catsgiving.

Grilled shrimp with crunchy vegetables makes for a modern po-boy from Killer PoBoys in the French Quarter
Ian McNulty

To have great po-boys, you need someone who can make the bread just right. You need someone with a good line on affordable, high-quality seafood and someone with no fear about perhaps applying too much roast beef gravy. The other essential ingredient is the customer with a local palate, the customer who will disregard national ad campaigns and coupons and bypass a rogue's gallery of fast food brands to get to a respectable po-boy shop.

Two marine biologists working triangular cages used in raising the baby oysters, known as spat.
Poppy Tooker

On this week's Louisiana Eats! we venture down to Grand Isle to explore the current state of Louisiana's shellfish industry.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

There’s an old saying about how to be successful in business - “Build a better mousetrap.” Meaning find a product everybody wants and do it better.

Peter's guests on Out to Lunch today have come up with new variations of products that enjoy massive worldwide popularity. Soft drinks and coffee.

Louisiana Sea Grant College Program at Louisiana State University

The state is bringing back its program to test fish for mercury, a heavy metal that is dangerous for human consumption. The program will be back up and running in January.

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality scaled back the program in 2008, when it ran out of funding.

Mercury comes from burning coal and other industrial activities. It gets into the air and then settles in streams and other waters, where fish absorb it.

From haunted restaurants to spine-chilling cemeteries, we explore the spooky side of Louisiana on this week's show.
Sally Asher

It's that time of year, when the cemeteries of Louisiana come alive and the streets are haunted by tethered spirits.

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we celebrate All Hallows' Eve by time traveling through the storied tombs of St. Louis Cemetery No. 3 with photographer and historian Sally Asher. Sally takes us through the grave sites of our dearly departed culinary legends, and we hear some spooky stories along the way.

Poppy Tooker and Chef John Besh
Shaun Johnson

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we join Chef John Besh in the Rouse’s Culinary Innovation Center, located at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum, for a lesson in cooking up some oyster stew. We also talk about John's newly released book, Besh Big Easy, which focuses on traditional dishes that he believes are disappearing from Louisiana dinner tables.

Ian McNulty

The banh mi has come a long way in New Orleans from the days when we had to call them “Vietnamese po-boys.”  Always a traditional favorite in Vietnamese communities, for food lovers elsewhere these delicious, multi-textured sandwiches have grown from something exotic, to a comfort food craving, to the launch pad for new ideas. 

Traditional German food at the Deutsches Haus Oktoberfest in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

There’s nothing strictly seasonal about weinerschnitzel or bratwurst. But dine around New Orleans during October and you might think we were witnessing just a brief window of availability to enjoy these traditional German dishes.

The reason isn’t the season, of course, but the theme, and that’s Oktoberfest, which is not any one event anymore but an entire month of eager encouragement to guzzle beer by the stein and tamp it all down under a mat of sauerkraut and sausage.

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