food

Ian McNulty

For players and coaches, a football game starts long before kickoff. The same holds true for the food-minded Saints fan. For such fans, it starts with choosing what to cook and devoting the hands-on work to ensure a victorious feast.

It's really no wonder. Take the enthusiasm of the Who Dat Nation, add south Louisiana's endemic passion for food and the results are predictably over the top.

Thanks to a quirk of history — and a love of bananas — New Orleans has had a Honduran population for more than a century. But that population exploded after Hurricane Katrina, when the jobs needed to rebuild the city drew waves of Honduran immigrants. Many of them stayed, and nearly a decade later, they've established a thriving — if somewhat underground — culinary community.

Signs of that community abound, if you know where to look.

Poppy Tooker

Evan McCommon has been converting his family's timber ranch into a biodiverse farm. The changes have been slow, but his resolve steady as the 1,100 acres change from a dense forest to an open savannah. 

Ian McNulty


Poppy Tooker

The interior of Aaron Sanchez and John Besh’s new restaurant is split into two designs: one that looks like the iconic architecture of New Orleans, and the other is an homage to Sanchez’s vibrant tattooed body. Even though both of these chefs have found success independently, their new collaboration at Johnny Sanchez is having each chef second guess what they took for granted. 

Ian McNulty

The Japanese restaurant that introduced many in New Orleans to sushi now is showing a different approach that goes far beyond the familiar rolls.

Ian McNulty

Chefs and restaurateurs are increasingly joining efforts to promote sustainable Gulf seafood for reasons that unite the economy, the ecology and regional culture.  

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

If you live in New Orleans you're familiar with this scenario: You're having a perfectly normal day when suddenly you groan, "Oh noooo." You're not watching the Saints' defense — it's that other sinking feeling you get as a New Orleanian: when the power goes off.

On this week's Out to Lunch Peter takes a look at the other 364 days, 23 hours in the life of New Orleans' Fortune 500 company, Entergy, with Mark Kleehammer, Entergy's Vice President of Business Development Services.

This week on Inside the Arts... playwright Lyle Kessler's Tony-nominated Orphans is currently running at the Marigny Theater. Orphans explores the human condition through the eyes of two brothers in search of a father figure.

Then, art imitates food. We'll interview a chef who's making a Cajun feast as part of an art installation.

And we round out with the Mysterious Wisterias, an evening of music and murder with a drop dead cast of masquerading Hollywood wannabees, detectives, reporters and undercover spies.

Scott Gold

In addition to countless children trick-or-treating, revelers of all ages will be hosting and attending parties this week to celebrate Halloween, a holiday that gives everyone an opportunity to get creative with costumes and cuisine.

Years ago, Scott Gold was asked to be a guest chef for a Halloween themed dinner party. Taken from this week's edition of Louisiana Eats!, Scott explains what dishes he prepared for his hair-raising meal and rhapsodizes about the joys of playing with one's food.

Pages