food

Brian Streeter

At one point in their lives, each of our guests had to choose whether or not they would inherit a family business. The answer didn't always come quickly, and most of them had to change the business to make it their own, but each decided to carry their family's tradition to the next generation.

Ian McNulty


Fruitcake is one of the most ridiculed holiday traditions, but for many families, it is one with a rich history. Marilyn Joiner has graciously shared two of her go-to fruitcake recipes. 

Splendid Fruitcake

flickr/Seattle Municial Archives

With so much to do during the holidays and so little time to do it, they often don't feel like "the most wonderful time of the year." But if you pocket a word of wisdom from our guests, perhaps you'll be able to go about the next couple weeks breathing easier. 

Eve Abrams

VEGGI is a community member owned and operated farmer’s cooperative based out of New Orleans East, Louisiana. VEGGI Farmer's Cooperative is dedicated to empowering growers in the Greater New Orleans area, starting in New Orleans East, in order to create sustainable, high quality jobs that enhance the quality of life of communities through increasing local food access and promotion of sustainable agriculture. 


Marjory Collins

The Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church is the oldest Orthodox Church in America. For 150 years the members of the church have passed down their traditions bit by bit, day by day. But now that our culture has changed and fewer people have extra time on their hands, the culture could be in jeopardy of being lost. This week on Louisiana Eats! we'll speak with the women of the church as they prepare finikia to hear their thoughts about community, family and heritage. 

Ian McNulty

For players and coaches, a football game starts long before kickoff. The same holds true for the food-minded Saints fan. For such fans, it starts with choosing what to cook and devoting the hands-on work to ensure a victorious feast.

It's really no wonder. Take the enthusiasm of the Who Dat Nation, add south Louisiana's endemic passion for food and the results are predictably over the top.

Thanks to a quirk of history — and a love of bananas — New Orleans has had a Honduran population for more than a century. But that population exploded after Hurricane Katrina, when the jobs needed to rebuild the city drew waves of Honduran immigrants. Many of them stayed, and nearly a decade later, they've established a thriving — if somewhat underground — culinary community.

Signs of that community abound, if you know where to look.

Poppy Tooker

Evan McCommon has been converting his family's timber ranch into a biodiverse farm. The changes have been slow, but his resolve steady as the 1,100 acres change from a dense forest to an open savannah. 

Ian McNulty


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