food

Line up for the French Quarter Irish Parade
Infrogmation of New Orleans / Flickr

Whether it means indulging in a Full Irish breakfast, marching in the Irish Channel Parade, or simply enjoying a pint of Guinness at the local Irish pub, it's time to celebrate St. Patrick's Day! On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we explore Irish history and heritage in the Pelican State, hear stories from 21st century Irish immigrants, and take a tour of local pubs to hear how they observe the Feast of Saint Patrick.

The diversity of the Gulf will be one of the topics at Slow Fish, an international conference in New Orleans this week.
Slow Fish

Update: Friday's Slow Fish program will be at The Broad Theater at 636 N. Broad Street. Conference only, no public festival.

The Slow Fish conference is March 10-13 at the Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave.

Its festival is held around the grounds and is free and open to the public on Friday (March 11), 3-7 p.m., Saturday (March 12), noon-6 p.m. 

See details at www.slowfish2016.com.

The fried seafood boat at Morton's Seafood in Madisonville.
Ian McNulty

The seafood boat is not a po-boy, and it’s different from a seafood platter. It belongs to its own niche. It flies brazenly in the face of modern low-carb diets, but survives at a handful of eateries. It can kindle cravings in those with a nostalgic bent, and maybe event those who enjoy a little spectacle with their supper.

The longtime deli FredRick's is now Bienvenue Bar & Grill.
Ian McNulty

Around downtown New Orleans, a small circuit of old fashioned diners and delis give their own particular read at the food life of New Orleans, set to the reliable rhythms of red bean Mondays and fried seafood Fridays.

"Absinthe Robette" lithograph by Henri Privat-Livemont from 1896, at the peak of absinthe's popularity.
Library of Congress

From the height of its popularity in the 19th century to its modern revival, absinthe has a long and storied reputation. On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we learn all about the formerly illicit elixir, and those whose ongoing fascination with the spirit has helped transform the discourse and regulations here in the United States.

Photo Courtesy Modernist Cuisine LLC

This week on Inside the Arts we explore The Photography of Modernist Cuisine, an exhibit by Microsoft co-founder  Nathan Myhrvold.

The exhibit which explores the science of food is on view at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum through February 29.  We talk with exhibit co-curator Melissa Lukach.

Szechuan pepper shrimp at Nine Roses in Gretna, La.
Ian McNulty

A circuit of Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants in New Orleans serve their own renditions of a distinctive, twice-fried style of seafood that makes a refreshing change of pace from the local standard. 

It goes by different names too --  salt baked seafood, salt and pepper seafood, Szechuan pepper seafood or rang muoi.

Crawfish season brings invitations that are as much about socializing as feasting.
Ian McNulty

Here’s one thing about the seasons in New Orleans: they don’t heed the weather.

Not in a town where you’re likely to be hanging Christmas lights wearing shorts, a T-shirt and a light sweat, or where the most famous winter holiday, Mardi Gras, is celebrated primarily outdoors no matter if its balmy and beautiful or spitting down freezing rain.

Pastry chef Erin Swanson of Restaurant R'evolution.
Poppy Tooker

There's romance in the air on Louisiana Eats!

In celebration of Valentine's Day, we take a trip to the very top of Louisiana, to Holly and Derek Schreiber's Sainte Terre, which hosts some of Louisiana's most romantic weddings. Situated in the small town of Benton, Sainte Terre combines Holly and Derek's culinary prowess and New York style with the devotion of a truly family-run business.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

As parades roll and people hit the streets for Carnival revelry, street food blossoms everywhere.

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