SoFAB Institute

Some museums offer a chance to connect with the highest achievements of art and ingenuity, to gaze over priceless wonders or to better understand pivotal moments of human history.

At the Southern Food & Beverage Museum, some of what resonates most richly may be artifacts you once had in your pantry or old brand names whose jingles are still stuck in your head.

You’re less likely to swoon over some rarified treasure as to delight in the recognition of something tied up with your own traditions and ties to the region’s food culture.  

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Monday, April 20 marks the fifth anniversary of the 2010 BP oil spill that sent millions of gallons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Right after the spill, seafood restaurants were bombarded with concerns about the safety of what was being served, and where it came from. Today, the public has stopped asking questions and is ready to eat, but now there’s a supply issue. While marketing campaigns are spreading a message of safe and bountiful Gulf seafood, others in the industry worry about the future.

Chris Kehoe

Big news on this week’s Louisiana Eats! We move into our new studios, located in the Southern Food and Beverage Museum on Oretha Castle Haley in Central City.

Ian McNulty

Think New Orleans needs more street food? This weekend's French Quarter Festival is teeming with inspiration for new ideas.

Street food is a term that has a lot of cachet in the dining world these days. I just wish we could get our hands on it a little more.

Ian McNulty

Mention Mexican food and many people think they already know the score. They start picturing tacos and burritos, chips and salsa, gobs of sour cream and rivers of melted cheddar. These are the touchstones of Tex-Mex cooking. That’s what many of us were raised on when it came to Mexican food. And, for the record, I love that stuff still.

But consider how the differences stacked up during a meal at Del Fuego Taqueria, a Uptown eatery that is part of a wave of new Mexican restaurants arriving in New Orleans.

Growing Up Brennan

Mar 28, 2015
Chris Kehoe

When Owen Brennan opened the Vieux Carré restaurant in 1946, he created a Louisiana dynasty that today numbers more than a dozen establishments run by multiple members of the Brennan’s clan. On this week’s show, we explore what it’s like to grow up Brennan.

Lally Brennan and Ti Martin share childhood memories and discuss what it’s like to be at the helm of Commander’s Palace today.

Paul Cheney

A spirit of competition and creative excess is helping a local charity cook-off grow bigger and better, and in ways beyond the food offerings.

Terry McCarthy

What’s sweeter than honey? Sugar! Or is it the other way around? On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we try to answer that question as we examine the sweetest things from Louisiana, California and across the world.

Ian McNulty

Food writer Ian McNulty on a new trend coming ashore in New Orleans with drinks, food and ambiance all set to the tone of tiki.

Infrogmation of New Orleans / Flickr

This week, we are headed straight to the living room. But we don’t mean the living room in your house; we’re talking about the nearest Irish Pub! In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, Louisiana Eats! is exploring all things Irish.

Tulane History Professor and author of the new book “The Irish in New Orleans,” Laura Kelley gives us a history of Irish immigrants in the Crescent City and how they influenced Louisiana culture in some unexpected ways.