Courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection

This episode of Louisiana Eats! examines African-American culinary life and culture in slavery times and today. Historic New Orleans Collection curator Erin Greenwald gives us a private tour of Purchased Lives: New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade, 1808–1865, an exhibit that examines the domestic slave trade in America. Solomon Northup, the free man of color who wrote the memoir "Twelve Years A Slave," comes to life with some amazing documents that shed light on his true story.

Ian McNulty

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Every week in Old Mandeville, the gray stucco train depot comes alive for the Mandeville Trailhead Community Market. Sponsored by the city, it saw about 24,000 visitors last year and hosts about 60 vendors every Saturday.

The market is a place to buy local crafts, soap, honey, baked goods and plants. Plus, it provides many with companionship and community.

Ian McNulty

Flavorful dishes and tasty treats are a highlight of the 18th annual "Blend Of The Bayou".  

Poppy Tooker

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we take a virtual trip to Paris. Our first stop is a rendezvous with New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu at the St. Roch Market – a place where charcuterie, crepes and cheeses are served – much like in a Parisian marché.

St. Roch is the last of the original city markets that formally dotted New Orleans' cityscape. Built in 1875, this landmark has recently been renovated and restored to its former glory.

Ian McNulty

There are lots of ways to prepare crawfish, but it’s the boil that brings out their best qualities, and these are not limited to flavor. Served in massive quantities, dumped upon a table where friends and strangers feast alongside each other, crawfish are the ultimate social food. And as it happens, the annual crawfish mania across this state hits its stride just when Louisiana itself is at its most social.

In 2010, just after the BP oil well in the Gulf of Mexico exploded, seafood restaurants were bombarded with questions from concerned diners: "How bad is the spill?" "Is this from the Gulf?" "Is it safe?" Demand for Gulf seafood tanked.

"You have to remember, that was literally weeks and months on end when you could turn on the TV at any time of day and see an oil well leaking unabatedly into the Gulf of Mexico," says Brett Anderson, feature food writer for

finchlake2000 / Flickr

On this week’s Louisiana Eats!, we’re remembering the devastation of the BP oil spill, which took place five years ago this week. Six weeks after the spill, we produced our very first episode of Louisiana Eats!, and there was no way we could ignore the disaster that was unfolding in the Gulf.

SoFAB Institute

Some museums offer a chance to connect with the highest achievements of art and ingenuity, to gaze over priceless wonders or to better understand pivotal moments of human history.

At the Southern Food & Beverage Museum, some of what resonates most richly may be artifacts you once had in your pantry or old brand names whose jingles are still stuck in your head.

You’re less likely to swoon over some rarified treasure as to delight in the recognition of something tied up with your own traditions and ties to the region’s food culture.