Ian McNulty

As the 10th anniversary of the storm approaches, the echoes of Hurricane Katrina and resulting levee failures continue to affect individuals and businesses within the food industry. On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we begin our two-part series on the storm with stories about the aftermath of Katrina on local bars, restaurants and facilities; and learn how the community has come back in a big way.

Leah Chase’s 65 years in the same New Orleans kitchen

Aug 21, 2015
Lizzie O'Leary and Jenny Ament

Since 1946, Leah Chase has been in the kitchen Dooky Chase's Restaurant in New Orleans. She’s served Quincy Jones, Jesse Jackson, Duke Ellington, Thurgood Marshall, James Baldwin, Ray Charles, former Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, and many others.

Quite simply, she's a legend in the city. Her restaurant was flooded with 5 1/2 feet of water from Katrina and closed for two years. Now 92, she speaks with Lizzie O’Leary from her kitchen, where she still shouts out orders to her staff every day.

Ian McNulty

As the Hurricane Katrina anniversary draws closer, you’ll hear a lot about New Orleans restaurants and what their comeback did for the city’s recovery. You’ll hear some of this for me too. It’s an important story, and a powerful one.

But first, I need to acknowledge the role played by a different sort of establishment that came back fast on the heels of Katrina, a type that may not have necessarily served food but did provide social nourishment — served up by the glass, the cup, the bottle or whichever way they could manage it.

Angie Garrett / Flickr

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we set out to discover hot spots both literally and figuratively in our backyard.

Baskets of perfectly seasoned deep-fried chicken sizzle during lunch hour at Dooky Chase Restaurant in New Orleans, a city famous for its food. But the real magic happens early in the morning, when Leah Chase, 92, arrives to prepare the day's specials.

"I made meatloaf today. Smothered pork chops. I did oyster and artichoke soup," says Chase.

Dooky Chase is a landmark in the city's historically African-American Treme neighborhood.

Ian McNulty

Of all the facets of local life that have been up for re-evaluation lately, the New Orleans neighborhood restaurant might seem an unlikely candidate for change.

You know the places I’m talking about. They’re long on tradition, beloved and generally successful, sharing a common approach that New Orleans knows by heart. Why would anyone mess with that?

Joe Shriner

On this week's episode of Louisiana Eats!, we visit two Gulf Coast farms where, through collaboration and innovation, farmers are creating better products that will help preserve the environment and give back to the community.

Ian McNulty

Scoring prized road food finds hiding behind big corporate logos on the Louisiana highway.

Food is always top of mind on any road trip, at least for me. After all, getting there may be half the fun, but getting there with some stops for good food… that is serious business.

Public Domain / Wikipedia

For some, Louisiana summers mean oppressive heat and thick humidity. For others, it means backyard barbecues and ice cold cocktails! On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we bask in the sunshine as we look at locally produced rum, outdoor grilling, and the recent resurgence of interest Tiki cocktails.

CroMary /

What do you do when you see an unfamiliar face? The more I get around Louisiana, the more I think the answer is, you stuff it.