food

Does charity start at home? For many in the New Orleans hospitality business, charity starts at the stove, and the bar. The food and drink they contribute are the lifeblood for countless charitable events and fundraisers, and they’re constantly answering the call to support community causes with their time and talent and product.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Today on Out to Lunch Peter is talking with two business people who are taking old fashioned taste and recycling it for a new market. Their businesses couldn’t be more different. But their reinvention of products based on a more innocent past are strangely similar.

Poppy Tooker and Carolyn Simmons, winner of the James Beard Foundation's Better Burger Project, on the patio of Blue in Shreveport.
Chris Jay

On this week's show, we catch up with some of the trailblazers and award winners of the Louisiana food scene and beyond.

Veal sweetbreads at Doris Metropolitan, a contemporary Mediterranean restaurant in the French Quarter.
Ian McNulty

Go to enough modern restaurants and you can play a form of food trend bingo. Cauliflower and kale, short ribs and pork belly, a gourmet take on mac and cheese – they trace connected lines across plenty of menu. And why not? They’re all delicious when handled right and they’re all pretty accessible crowd pleasers too. It’s simple math. 

But then, look at a cross section of particular New Orleans menus, and you might spot a trend that doesn’t seem to add up.

Chef Magnus Nilsson at Fäviken in Sweden.
Anders Carlsson / Flickr

On this week's show, we voyage to the Land of the Midnight Sun and explore Nordic culinary traditions. To begin our journey, we visit with Chef Magnus Nilsson, the genius behind Fäviken, a world renowned restaurant in a far-flung farming region of Sweden.

K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen staff photo, 1981.
Courtesy of Frank Brigtsen

Chef Paul Prudhomme changed the American food world forever with his creative, exuberant love for Creole and Cajun food. He was the first American chef to take the reins at Commander's Palace — where the world first had a taste of his culinary genius. He pioneered the now commonplace farm-to-table movement, as he championed Louisiana's farmers and fishermen. As Ella Brennan said, “He had magic in his hands.”

Chef Prudhomme and Chef Frank Brigtsen, passing the skillet outside of Brigtsen's Restaurant, 1986.
Courtesy of Frank Brigtsen

As we reach the end of 2015, we're taking a look back at the triumphs and tragedies of the year past.

2015 was a big year for Louisiana Eats! This June, we celebrated our fifth anniversary on the air, with listeners and friends including the NPR affiliates WWNO, WRKF, KRVS and Red River Radio. We found ourselves traveling across the state, the country and the world, covering topics ranging from substance abuse in the service industry, revelry and tradition at the annual Blackpot Festival in Lafayette, ghosts in the attic at Tujague's Restaurant, seafood innovation on the Gulf Coast and the domestic slave trade in America.

Gregg Goldman / Music Inside Out

Food may be the most popular subject on the planet. In fact, scientists have long said that men and women think about food more often than almost anything else: more often than global warming or world peace, more than super heroes, more often, even, than sex.

We can’t beat those odds, so this week on Music Inside Out we make a grocery list and dedicate the show to Louisiana songs about food.

Musician and author Ben Sandmel joins us for part of the hour. And we’re serving up songs that will hit the spot and keep you happy, until it’s time to think about food again.

Zdenek Kastanek (center) with fellow 28 Hong Kong Street employees after being awarded "Best International Bar Team" at the 2015 Tales of the Cocktail Spirited Awards.
Tales of the Cocktail / Facebook

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we examine the lives of five different individuals who have taken long, adventurous journeys, both personally and physically, to reach maturity and a clear sense of purpose.

Off bottom cultivation is bringing a different flavor to Gulf oysters.
Ian McNulty

Oysters make people happy. That’s a simple truth that resonates deep, and goes beyond satisfying an appetite or even a craving. It’s something as visceral as the raw oyster itself, bursting with the essence of the tides. It can instill a sense of well being bordering on euphoria.

In New Orleans today there are many more ways to chase this bliss. As the number of eateries serving oysters has increased, so have the variety of oyster bar types in which to partake, depending on your style, your mood or your budget.

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