Ben Burkett

When the Crescent City Farmers Market was founded 20 years ago, farmers in nearby rural areas were hesitant about coming to New Orleans. To them the city was a haven of crime and traffic, but connecting the city to the farm created more opportunities than they imagined.

The harvest: 2,000 pounds of chardonnay reserve picked in half an hour. The professionals can pick just as many grapes in a quarter as much time.
Terry McCarthy

Since 1986, Cakebread Cellars in Napa Valley has gathered together a small group of chefs, journalists and food enthusiasts for an intensive four-day seminar at the American Harvest Workshop. Recently, the Louisiana Eats! team was invited to participate, so we've brought back some of our favorite stories from the West Coast.

Count Bernard Saint Bris and host Poppy Tooker in the gardens of his family's château, Clos Lucé.
Courtesy of Poppy Tooker

Recently, Louisiana Eats! host Poppy Tooker packed up her recording equipment, bid a cheery adieu to her company of sound engineers and went rogue to make Louisiana Eats! radio in France. On this week's episode, we share Poppy's incredible experience abroad.

Ian McNulty

All around New Orleans, the sounds of the season signal cooler weather ahead. Some of these speak directly to our appetites too.

If you heard a sharp snap one recent morning, it might've been the sound of New Orleanians collectively switching off their air-conditioners at the start of a dramatically cooler day.

Marie Saint Bris sets the table for "le dîner bleu" in the dining room of her family's Château Beauchêne in France's Loire River Valley.
Poppy Tooker

Knowing the human history behind any dish just makes it taste better. On this week's episode of Louisiana Eats!, we hit the books with several food historians to hear tales of our culinary past.

First, we speak with Dr. David Shields of the University of South Carolina, who shares his years of research on American culinarians. His upcoming book, "Culinarians: American Chefs, Caterers & Restaurateurs," is the first ever biographical collection of culinary movers and shakers in America.

Soft shell crab tacos at Sun Ray Grill, a neighborhood eatery in Gretna.
Ian McNulty

Jerk chicken from Coco Hut, a Caribbean restaurant in New Orleans with a bold way with spice.
Ian McNulty

Keeping some semblance of cool as our summer heat rages on can take some strategy. We park the car under oak limbs and walk on the shady side of the street. We keep ice water handy and, when it's time to eat, something cool and light sounds like just the thing.

But across the spectrum, there is another way, and it’s to embrace the heat, to own it. Revel in fiery foods and you may just beat the heat at its own game.

Joe Shriner

The food scene of New Orleans has grown tremendously since Hurricane Katrina. On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we complete our two-part series on the storm by taking a look at the changing face of the city's food scene over the past 10 years.

Food memories resonate from the post-Katrina experience in New Orleans. This offer of red beans and hospitality was displayed on a Mid-City home for months after the floods.
Ian McNulty

Sometimes a sound will bring it back, as random as loose siding beating against a wall, recalling a shredded city, or as overt as the diesel rumble of an army Humvee on city streets.

Even if you’re ready to close the door on Katrina and the levee failures, and plenty of us have, the persistence of sense memories may have other plans. It’s that vivid, involuntary recall of what we took in, and no matter where we managed to store it this stuff can come creeping back, even a decade later.

Undeterred by the devastation, second line clubs returned to New Orleans a few months after the flood, determined to uphold the city's cultural traditions. This photo is of the 2009 Prince of Wales second line parade.
Jason Saul

Well, we’ve made it. Almost. It’s been a long, hot summer and this is our last episode as we come up on the tenth anniversary of Katrina.

The city is abuzz with journalists and experts and NGOs and politicians. We thought we’d use this last bit of The Debris to explore a word they’re all using to talk about New Orleans: resilience.