food

Bring Your Own Presents: 'Run For The Border'

Dec 29, 2016
Jess Pinkham / Bring Your Own

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

On this week’s show, we bid farewell to 2016 and raise a toast to the New Year by looking back at legends and looking forward to new beginnings. 

 

First, we celebrate the life and legacy of Edgar “Dooky” Chase, who passed away this year at the age of 88. Leah Chase shares stories from their 70 years of marriage, an era marked by the civil rights movement and other transformative moments at their Treme establishment. 

Isaac Toups Family Christmas
Joe Shriner

The holidays are here and we’re celebrating family food traditions old and new! 

 

We begin at the home of Chef Isaac Toups, where he and his family celebrate Christmas Cajun-style! Culminating an eventful year for Isaac— he earned the title of “fan favorite” on Bravo’s Top Chef: California and opened up a new restaurant in the Southern Food and Beverage Museum: Toups’ South — we join the Toups family for an unforgettable meal. After we finish our s’mores for dessert, we gather round for Isaac’s annual reading of “The Cajun Night Before Christmas.”

On this week’s show, we’re capturing portraits in sound of several superstar chefs in Louisiana and beyond. 

Deyan Georgiev / Shutterstock.com

True oyster lust does not stop -- not when you're full but there are still a few oysters on the tray and not in summer, despite that old adage you may have heard concerning months spelled without the “R.” The romance of the oyster cannot be so primly constrained.            

Still, though, as winter arrives  and as our Gulf oysters inch closer to their seasonal prime, the anticipation gets keener and the pleasure of oysters grows sharper. If you’re the sort of oyster eater whose interest perks up as the weather cools down, it's time to catch up on some changes around New Orleans since last season.

Ed Piglia and Poppy Tooker at Ed's warehouse filled with New Orleans memorabilia.
Joe Shriner

On this week’s show, we spend a day in the life of Louisiana’s most fascinating culinary collectors.

We begin in the French Quarter at Lucullus Antiques, where owner Patrick Dunne takes us into the mind of a collector and describes his favorite hidden gems of the culinary collecting world.

A dark roux, country style chicken and andouille gumbo from Brocato's Catering in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

No dish in New Orleans is more Creole than gumbo. And, appropriately enough for that Creole identity, there’s no single answer to just how it should taste and what can go into the pot.

This has been on my mind because this weekend a veritable dream team of New Orleans Creole eateries will serve more than a dozen versions of gumbo at the Treme Creole Gumbo Festival (see full details below).

Out to Lunch, with Peter Ricchiuti.
Sam Weil / It's New Orleans

Have you been to Costco? Or Trader Joes? Or Whole Foods? Or any of the who-knows-how-many other grocery stores in New Orleans? Have you noticed that any time you go, every store always seems busy. There’s no doubt that here in New Orleans we have a love affair with grocery shopping. We even have our own unique name for it – making groceries.

On this edition of Out to Lunch we’re talking about making groceries from two very different perspectives.

Host Poppy Tooker with JoAnn Clevenger
Reggie Morris

On this week's show, we speak with some powerful and influential women in the food industry who are getting the job done.

We begin with local treasure JoAnn Clevenger, restaurateur behind the Upperline. While she is most famous for her Uptown restaurant, JoAnn has worn many different hats over her lifetime, managing multiple businesses with pluck and determination.

Ian McNulty

In New Orleans, there’s long been a natural order when it comes to enjoying a bit of natural beauty with your dinner and drinks. It was the courtyards of old French Quarter restaurants or a seat by the flaming fountain at Pat O’Brien’s. Watching streetcars rattle past from the porch at the Columns Hotel always qualified, and any balcony was fair game. 

But now the game has changed, and here’s the latest twist: more restaurants and bars are going the full monty, devoting most of their space and much of their business model to the al fresco appeal.

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